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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hanks, Angela; McGrew, Annie; Zessoules, Daniella
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The analysis in this issue brief examines apprenticeship programs over the past decade—from fiscal year 2008 through 2017—to observe gaps in participation and wages among women and people of color. In general, it finds that women remain deeply underrepresented in apprenticeship programs and that wages among women and black or African American apprentices are much lower than those of other apprentices. Even though these programs are intended and have the potential to develop the U.S. workforce, increase earnings, and prepare workers for the jobs of the future, their current gender and racial compositions tell a different story more work must be done to make it a reality. (Author introduction)

    The analysis in this issue brief examines apprenticeship programs over the past decade—from fiscal year 2008 through 2017—to observe gaps in participation and wages among women and people of color. In general, it finds that women remain deeply underrepresented in apprenticeship programs and that wages among women and black or African American apprentices are much lower than those of other apprentices. Even though these programs are intended and have the potential to develop the U.S. workforce, increase earnings, and prepare workers for the jobs of the future, their current gender and racial compositions tell a different story more work must be done to make it a reality. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Kendall, Jessica; Nadeau, Lou; Acs, Gregory; Neumark, David
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities, on August 9, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EDT. The webinar focused on how changes in the minimum wage affect individuals, families, employers and the economy. Today, the U.S. economy continues to grow and the unemployment rate remains low. Wage growth, however, remains slow for much of the labor force. The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 an hour since 2009. The combination of job growth and wage stagnation has led many localities to increase their minimum wage. Economists and research experts presented on what we know about minimum wage increases and their effects on workers, low-income families, employers, and state/local economies. 

    This is the PowerPoint presentation from Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities. View the recording, transcript, and Q&A document...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities, on August 9, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EDT. The webinar focused on how changes in the minimum wage affect individuals, families, employers and the economy. Today, the U.S. economy continues to grow and the unemployment rate remains low. Wage growth, however, remains slow for much of the labor force. The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 an hour since 2009. The combination of job growth and wage stagnation has led many localities to increase their minimum wage. Economists and research experts presented on what we know about minimum wage increases and their effects on workers, low-income families, employers, and state/local economies. 

    This is the PowerPoint presentation from Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities. View the recording, transcript, and Q&A document here.

  • Individual Author: Kendall, Jessica; Nadeau, Lou; Acs, Gregory; Neumark, David
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities, on August 9, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EDT. The webinar focused on how changes in the minimum wage affect individuals, families, employers and the economy. Today, the U.S. economy continues to grow and the unemployment rate remains low. Wage growth, however, remains slow for much of the labor force. The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 an hour since 2009. The combination of job growth and wage stagnation has led many localities to increase their minimum wage. Economists and research experts presented on what we know about minimum wage increases and their effects on workers, low-income families, employers, and state/local economies. 

    This document is the Q&A from Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities. View the recording, transcript, and Q&A document...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities, on August 9, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EDT. The webinar focused on how changes in the minimum wage affect individuals, families, employers and the economy. Today, the U.S. economy continues to grow and the unemployment rate remains low. Wage growth, however, remains slow for much of the labor force. The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 an hour since 2009. The combination of job growth and wage stagnation has led many localities to increase their minimum wage. Economists and research experts presented on what we know about minimum wage increases and their effects on workers, low-income families, employers, and state/local economies. 

    This document is the Q&A from Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities. View the recording, transcript, and Q&A document here.

     

  • Individual Author: Kendall, Jessica; Nadeau, Lou; Acs, Gregory; Neumark, David
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities, on August 9, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EDT. The webinar focused on how changes in the minimum wage affect individuals, families, employers and the economy. Today, the U.S. economy continues to grow and the unemployment rate remains low. Wage growth, however, remains slow for much of the labor force. The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 an hour since 2009. The combination of job growth and wage stagnation has led many localities to increase their minimum wage. Economists and research experts presented on what we know about minimum wage increases and their effects on workers, low-income families, employers, and state/local economies. 

    This document is the transcript from Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities. View the recording, PowerPoint, and Q&A document...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities, on August 9, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EDT. The webinar focused on how changes in the minimum wage affect individuals, families, employers and the economy. Today, the U.S. economy continues to grow and the unemployment rate remains low. Wage growth, however, remains slow for much of the labor force. The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 an hour since 2009. The combination of job growth and wage stagnation has led many localities to increase their minimum wage. Economists and research experts presented on what we know about minimum wage increases and their effects on workers, low-income families, employers, and state/local economies. 

    This document is the transcript from Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities. View the recording, PowerPoint, and Q&A document here.

     

  • Individual Author: Bauman, Kevin; Christensen, Cody
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    To address these labor market challenges, many have turned to America’s workforce development system. Recent efforts from Congress and the White House confirm that policymakers are serious about expanding job-training opportunities. But even with the heightened focus, a shockingly small percentage of individuals leveraging the workforce system combine available Department of Labor training funds with money from other federal and state programs—despite that many more might qualify for additional aid. Incongruent bureaucratic processes commonly inhibit the effectiveness of workforce training, and policy requirements are not clearly communicated to training seekers, financial aid administrators, and private entities. If the goal is to increase the number of job seekers that participate in high-quality training programs, more can be done to improve the coordination between the Department of Labor and these groups. This report offers recommendations for enhancing the federal workforce development system by reviewing and identifying inefficiencies in the current system. It concludes by...

    To address these labor market challenges, many have turned to America’s workforce development system. Recent efforts from Congress and the White House confirm that policymakers are serious about expanding job-training opportunities. But even with the heightened focus, a shockingly small percentage of individuals leveraging the workforce system combine available Department of Labor training funds with money from other federal and state programs—despite that many more might qualify for additional aid. Incongruent bureaucratic processes commonly inhibit the effectiveness of workforce training, and policy requirements are not clearly communicated to training seekers, financial aid administrators, and private entities. If the goal is to increase the number of job seekers that participate in high-quality training programs, more can be done to improve the coordination between the Department of Labor and these groups. This report offers recommendations for enhancing the federal workforce development system by reviewing and identifying inefficiencies in the current system. It concludes by forwarding several policy suggestions aimed at improving the way that Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act funding is used by job seekers and training providers. (Excerpt from author introduction) 

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