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What can we learn about neighborhood effects from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment?

Date Added to Library: 
Friday, March 30, 2012 - 16:02
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 
10.1086/588741
Priority: 
normal
Individual Author: 
Ludwig, Jens
Kling, Jeffrey R.
Katz, Lawrence F.
Sanbonmatsu, Lisa
Liebman, Jeffrey B.
Duncan, Greg J.
Kessler, Ronald C.
Reference Type: 
Research Methodology: 
Published Date: 
July 2008
Published Date (Text): 
July 2008
Publication: 
American Journal of Sociology
Volume: 
114
Issue Number: 
1
Page Range: 
144-188
Year: 
2008
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

Experimental estimates from Moving to Opportunity (MTO) show no significant impacts of moves to lower-poverty neighborhoods on adult economic self-sufficiency four to seven years after random assignment. The authors disagree with Clampet-Lundquist and Massey’s claim that MTO was a weak intervention and therefore uninformative about neighborhood effects. MTO produced large changes in neighborhood environments that improved adult mental health and many outcomes for young females. Clampet-Lundquist and Massey’s claim that MTO experimental estimates are plagued by selection bias is erroneous. Their new nonexperimental estimates are uninformative because they add back the selection problems that MTO’s experimental design was intended to overcome. (author abstract)

Page Count: 
45
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