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Baton Rouge

Vocational rehabilitation counselors' perceptions and experiences of career theory usage with people with a disability and a criminal record

Individual Author: 
Maiden, Rodney

Vocational guidance and career counseling is the primary service provided to all applicants applying for vocational rehabilitation services. Vocational rehabilitation (VR) counselors specialize in helping people with a disability acquire employment. Yet, when the person has a disability and a criminal record this adds an additional element for consideration. The object of this research is Louisiana vocational rehabilitation counselors in the Baton Rouge Regional Office (BRRO) and their vocational guidance and career counseling skills of people with a disability and a criminal record.

The long-term effects of Building Strong Families: A relationship skills education program for unmarried parents, technical supplement

Individual Author: 
Moore, Quinn
Wood, Robert G.
Clarkwest, Andrew
Killewald, Alexandra
Monahan, Shannon

This report is a technical supplement to the 36-month impact report for the Building Strong Families (BSF) evaluation (Wood et al. 2012). It provides additional detail about the research design, analytic methods, and variable construction that were used for the 36-month analysis, as well as a discussion of the subgroup analysis that was conducted. Additionally, the report discusses the treatment-on-the-treated (TOT) impact analysis, an analysis of BSF’s effects on couples who actually attended BSF group sessions.

The Building Strong Families project: The long-term effects of building strong families: A relationship skills education program for unmarried parents

Individual Author: 
Wood, Robert G.
Moore, Quinn
Clarkwest, Andrew
Killewald, Alexandra
Monahan, Shannon

The Building Strong Families (BSF) evaluation assessed the impacts of eight programs offering a similar model of healthy marriage and relationship skills and support services to interested low-income unmarried parents around the time of the birth of a child.  While many unmarried parents live together when their children are born, their relationships are often tenuous and most end within a few years of the child’s birth.

BSF's effects on couples who attended group relationship skills sessions: A special analysis of 15-month data

Individual Author: 
Wood, Robert G.
Moore, Quinn
Clarkwest, Andrew

Building Strong Families (BSF), a program of relationship skills education for unwed parents, has been found in a rigorous random assignment evaluation to have limited effects on couples who signed up for the program (Wood, McConnell, et al. 2010). Averaging results across the eight local programs that participated in the evaluation, BSF had no effect on the couples’ relationship quality or on the likelihood that they would remain romantically involved or get married 15 months after they enrolled in the program.

The Building Strong Families project: Strengthening unmarried parents' relationships: The early impacts of Building Strong Families: Technical report

Individual Author: 
Wood, Robert G.
McConnell, Sheena
Hsueh, JoAn
Clarkwest, Andrew
Moore, Quinn

This report is a technical supplement to the 15-month impact report for the Building Strong Families (BSF) evaluation (Wood et al. 2010). It provides additional detail about the research design (Chapter I), analytic methods (Chapter II), and variable construction (Chapters III and IV) that were used for the 15-month analysis. Chapter V of this report provides a discussion of the subgroup analysis that was conducted. The full set of impact results generated as part of this analysis is included in the appendices of this volume. (author abstract)

The Building Strong Families project: Implementation of eight programs to strengthen unmarried parent families

Individual Author: 
Dion, M. Robin
Avellar, Sarah A.
Clary, Elizabeth

The Building Strong Families (BSF) project was launched in 2002 to develop, implement, and rigorously test voluntary interventions aimed at strengthening the families of unmarried couples with children. BSF programs were implemented by non-profit and public agencies at 12 locations in seven states, and enrolled more than 5,000 volunteer couples, who were randomly assigned by the BSF research team to an intervention or control group.

Implementation of the Building Strong Families program

Individual Author: 
Dion, M. Robin
Hershey, Alan M.
Zaveri, Heather H.
Avellar, Sarah A.
Strong, Debra A.
Silman, Timothy
Moore, Ravaris

The Building Strong Families (BSF) project is a large-scale program demonstration and rigorous evaluation to learn whether well-designed interventions can help interested romantically involved unmarried parents build stronger relationships and fulfill their aspirations for a healthy marriage if they choose to wed.

The Building Strong Families project: Strengthening unmarried parents' relationships: The early impacts of Building Strong Families

Individual Author: 
Wood, Robert G.
McConnell, Sheena
Moore, Quinn
Clarkwest, Andrew
Hsueh, JoAnn
Reference type: 
Report

Although most children raised by single parents fare well, on average, they are at greater risk of living in poverty and experiencing health, academic, and behavioral problems than children growing up with married biological parents. If interventions can improve the quality of unmarried parents’ relationships and increase the likelihood that they remain together, these interventions might also improve the well-being of their children. One possible approach to improving child well-being is thus strengthening the relationships of low-income couples through relationship skills education.