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Denver

MotherWise: Implementation of a healthy marriage and relationship education program for pregnant and new mothers

Individual Author: 
Baumgartner, Scott
Paulsell, Diane

The Strengthening Relationship Education and Marriage Services (STREAMS) evaluation is a random assignment impact study and in-depth process study of five Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education (HMRE) grantees funded by ACF’s Office of Family Assistance (OFA). To maximize its contributions to the evidence base and to inform future program and evaluation design, STREAMS is examining the full range of populations served by HMRE programs, including adult individuals, adult couples, and youth in high schools.

Denver Pay for Success Initiative: Supportive housing

Individual Author: 
Gillespie, Sarah
Hanson, Devlin
Cunningham, Mary
Pergamit, Michael

A few years ago, Denver’s Crime Prevention and Control Commission (CPCC) recognized that there was a population of “frequent users” - individuals who cycle in and out of jail – who they believed were chronically homeless and suffered from mental health and substance abuse problems. The CPCC did a data match pulling homeless system data, healthcare utilization data, and criminal justice data together for 250 frequent users to see how these individuals touched other systems.

Leading the way: Characteristics and early experiences of selected Early Head Start programs. Volume II: Program profiles

Individual Author: 
Berlin, Lisa J.
Kisker, Ellen Eliason
Love, John M.
Raikes, Helen
Boller, Kimberly
Paulsell, Diane
Rosenberg, Linda
Coolahan, Kathleen

This volume and its companion volumes are the first of two reports designed to share the experiences of the 17 Early Head Start research programs with others. The first report focuses on the programs early in their implementation (fall 1997), approximately two years after they were funded and one year after they began serving families. Volume I examines the characteristics and experiences of the 17 research programs from a cross-site perspective, focusing on the similarities and differences among the programs in fall 1997.

Predicting repeated and persistent family homelessness: Do families’ characteristics and experiences matter?

Individual Author: 
Glendening, Zachary
Shinn, Marybeth

Research indicates that most families using emergency shelters stay briefly—one to four or five months—and rarely return (Culhane et al. 2007). However, some families remain homeless for long periods of time or experience repeated episodes of homelessness. These families may have characteristics and service needs that differ from those of families who leave shelter quickly and permanently. Communities and homelessness practitioners might benefit from identifying those families’ characteristics and experiences to improve targeting of services.

Explaining lead poisoning among refugee children: The role of the resettlement process

Individual Author: 
Abdulrahman, Dalia M.
Horton, Sarah B.

United States children living in poorly maintained housing built before 1978 are at particular risk of lead poisoning, which harms their physical and cognitive development. Studies have shown that although refugee children may have been exposed to lead in their homelands, some experienced increased blood lead (BPb) levels after their resettlement in the United States.

Homeless families’ experiences with public benefit programs, employment, and family transitions

Individual Author: 
Benton, Amanda
Dunton, Lauren
Khadduri, Jill
Walton, Douglas

These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S.

Behavioral health improvements over time among adults in families experiencing homelessness

Individual Author: 
Shinn, Marybeth
Gubits, Daniel
Dunton, Lauren

The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

Promoting healthy relationships among youth through healthy marriage and relationship education

Individual Author: 
Illlangasekare, Samantha
Alamillo, Julia
Paulsell, Diane
Scott, Mindy

This video and its accompanying presenation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS).While a large proportion of youth (i.e., participants ages 14 to 24) are served through federally funded healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) programming, we have relatively little information about these programs and their effectiveness. To address this knowledge gap, OPRE and OFA are conducting several research projects focused on healthy marriage and relationship education for youth.

Breaking the homelessness–jail cycle in Denver

Individual Author: 
Gillespie, Sarah
Hanson, Devlin
Cunningham, Mary K.
Pergamit, Mike
Kooragayala, Shiva

An experiment in supportive housing is beginning to pay off for the city of Denver, its homeless residents, and a group of investors banking on social impact. This fact sheet highlights early results from the Denver Supportive Housing Social Impact Bond Initiative. (Author abstract)