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Los Angeles County

Association of maternal depressive symptoms and offspring physical health in low-income families

Individual Author: 
Thompson, Sarah M.
Jiang, Lu
Hammen, Constance
Whaley, Shannon E.

Objectives The present study sought to examine the association between maternal depressive symptoms and characteristics of offspring physical health, including health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization, among low-income families. Maternal engagement was explored as a mediator of observed effects. Methods Cross-sectional survey data from a community sample of 4589 low-income women and their preschool-age children participating in the WIC program in Los Angeles County were analyzed using logistic, Poisson, and zero-inflated negative binomial regression.

Severe housing-cost burden and obesity among preschool-aged low-income children in Los Angeles County

Individual Author: 
Nobari, Tabashir Z.
Whaley, Shannon E.
Blumenberg, Evelyn
Prelip, Michael L.
Wang, May C.

Despite high rates of housing-cost burden in the United States, little is known regarding its impact on childhood obesity. In this article, we determine whether low-income 2-5-year-olds living in housing-cost burdened households are more likely to be obese and examine the potential moderators and behavioral and psychosocial mediators of this relationship. We used data from a triennial survey (2011, 2014) of a random sample of Los Angeles County participants of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (n = 2307).

You shall not pass: The use of evaluation tollgates in building evidence for social programs

Individual Author: 
Woolverton, Maria
Bradley, M.C.
Gabel, George
Melz, Heidi

This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Too often, programs are prematurely evaluated without a planning phase to build a program’s evaluation capacity. However, there is growing consensus that prior to summative evaluation programs should undergo an intermediate step, referred to as “evaluation tollgates,” to determine whether programs are well-implemented and truly ready for rigorous evaluation.

More than a nudge: Engaging TANF recipients in welfare-to-work programs

Individual Author: 
Kabak, Victoria
Baird, Peter
Farrell, Mary
Sutcliffe, Sophia

Building on the first major effort to bring a behavioral science lens to programs serving poor families in the United States, the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency – Next Generation project is testing interventions to increase TANF recipients’ engagement in three sites: Los Angeles County, Monroe County (NY), and Washington State. Moderated by Victoria Kabak (Administration for Children and Families), this presentation will share the diagnostic design model and introduce the interventions. (Author introduction)

The salience and severity of relationship problems among low-income couples

Individual Author: 
Jackson, Grace L.
Trail, Thomas E.
Kennedy, David P.
Williamson, Hannah C.
Bradbury, Thomas N.
Karney, Benjamin R.

Developing programs to support low-income married couples requires an accurate understanding of the challenges they face. To address this question, we assessed the salience and severity of relationship problems by asking 862 Black, White, and Latino newlywed spouses (N=431 couples) living in low-income neighborhoods to (a) free list their 3 biggest sources of disagreement in the marriage, and (b) rate the severity of the problems appearing on a standard relationship problem inventory.

The salience and severity of relationship problems among low-income couples

Individual Author: 
Jackson, Grace L.
Trail, Thomas E.
Kennedy, David P.
Williamson, Hannah C.
Bradbury, Thomas N.
Karney, Benjamin R.

Developing programs to support low-income married couples requires an accurate understanding of the challenges they face. To address this question, we assessed the salience and severity of relationship problems by asking 862 Black, White, and Latino newlywed spouses (N = 431 couples) living in low-income neighborhoods to (a) free list their 3 biggest sources of disagreement in the marriage, and (b) rate the severity of the problems appearing on a standard relationship problem inventory.

The relationship of preschool child-care quality to children's cognitive and social developmental trajectories through second grade

Individual Author: 
Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen S.
Burchinal, Margaret R.
Clifford, Richard M.
Culkin, Mary L.
Howes, Carollee
Kagan, Sharon Lynn
Yazejian, Noreen

The cognitive and socioemotional development of 733 children was examined longitudinally from ages 4 to 8 years as a function of the quality of their preschool experiences in community child-care centers, after adjusting for family selection factors related to child-care quality and development. These results provide evidence that child-care quality has a modest long-term effect on children's patterns of cognitive and socioemotional development at least through kindergarten, and in some cases, through second grade.

Sequential neighborhood effects: The effect of long-term exposure to concentrated disadvantage on children’s reading and math test scores

Individual Author: 
Hicks, Andrew L.
Handcock, Mark S.
Sastry, Narayan
Pebley, Anne R.

Prior research has suggested that children living in a disadvantaged neighborhood have lower achievement test scores, but these studies typically have not estimated causal effects that account for neighborhood choice. Recent studies used propensity score methods to account for the endogeneity of neighborhood exposures, comparing disadvantaged and nondisadvantaged neighborhoods. We develop an alternative propensity function approach in which cumulative neighborhood effects are modeled as a continuous treatment variable. This approach offers several advantages.

Developing a disaster preparedness campaign targeting low-income Latino immigrants: Focus group results for Project PREP

Individual Author: 
Eisenman, David P.
Glik, Deborah C.
Maranon, Richard
Asch, Steven
Gonzales, Lupe

Low-income immigrant Latinos are particularly vulnerable to disasters because they are both ill-prepared and disproportionately affected. Disaster preparedness programs that are culturally appropriate must be developed and tested. To develop such a program, we conducted 12 focus groups with low-income immigrant Latinos to understand their perceptions and understanding of disaster preparedness, and facilitators and obstacles to it. Participants were concerned about remaining calm during an earthquake.

Measuring outcomes in a community resilience program: A new metric for evaluating results at the household level

Individual Author: 
Eisenman, David P.
Adams, Rachel M.
Rivard, Helene

Community resilience programs require metrics for evaluation but none exist for measuring outcomes at the household and neighborhood level. Objectives: We develop and describe a new index, the LACCDR index of community resilience, to examine how resilience varied across communities at baseline, prior to implementation of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project (LACCDR). Methods: We surveyed 4700 adult residents in the sixteen LACCDR communities in English, Spanish and Korean.