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New York City

Long Island racial equity through economic advancement

Individual Author: 
Brown, Steven
Charleston, Donnie
Ramarkrishnan, Kriti
Ford, LesLeigh, D.

Long Island— the United States’ first suburb—is by many measures an economically prosperous place.  However, opportunity is not spread equally on Long Island. Long-standing discrimination and residential segregation created and maintains racial disparities, with black Long Islanders experiencing more limited access to employment, lower incomes, and greater financial insecurity.

Using administrative data for social worker outreach for homeless families at risk for child maltreatment

Individual Author: 
Ghesquiere, Angela
Kealey, Edith
Dinan, Kinsey

This presentation was given at the 57th National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Workshop in 2019. This presentation provides an overview of the New York City Department of Social Services' use of administrative data to determine risk for child maltreatment amongst homeless families. The analysis is part of efforts related to New York City's High Risk/High Needs initiative. 

Serving opportunity youth through innovative collaborations in government

Individual Author: 
Mevs, Pascale
Ristow, Liam
Cummings, Danielle

This presentation is from the 57th National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Workshop. This presentation provides the results of multiple studies conducted by MRDC and Westat investigating the impact of New York City Mayor's Office programs focused on serving disconnected youth. 

Parenting in poverty: Attention bias and anxiety interact to predict parents’ perceptions of daily parenting hassles

Individual Author: 
Finegood, Eric D.
Raver, C. Cybele
DeJoseph, Meriah L.
Blair, Clancy

Research has long acknowledged the centrality of parents’ subjective experiences in the caregiving role for the organization of parenting behaviors and family functioning. Recent scientific advances in cognitive process models and in the neurobiology of parenting indicate that parenting is shaped in part by conscious and nonconscious cognitive processes.

Adverse childhood experiences, poverty, and parenting stress

Individual Author: 
Steele, Howard
Bate, Jordan
Steele, Miriam
Rishi Dube, Shanta
Danskin, Kerri
Knafo, Hannah
Nikitiades, Adella
Bonuck, Karen
Meissner, Paul
Murphy, Anne

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with physical and mental health problems in adulthood, as well as unresolved or discordant states of mind regarding attachments that have implications for problematic parenting. Currently, there are no studies on the association between ACEs and adults’ subjective experiences of stress in the parenting role, where socioeconomic status (SES)!related poverty effects have been controlled for—the central question behind the current study.

Long-term effects of social-emotional learning on receipt of special education and grade retention: Evidence from a randomized trial of INSIGHTS

Individual Author: 
McCormick, Meghan P.
Neuhaus, Robin
Horn, E. Parham
O'Connor, Erin E.
White, Hope S.
Harding, Samantha
Cappella, Elise
McClowry, Sandee

Social–Emotional Learning (SEL) programs are school-based preventive interventions that aim to improve children’s social–emotional skills and behavioral development. Although meta-analytic research has shown that SEL programs can improve academic and behavioral outcomes in the short term, few studies have examined program effects on receipt of special education services and grade retention in the longer term.

Bridges to education and employment for justice-involved youth

Individual Author: 
Cramer, Lindsey
Lynch, Mathew
Goff, Margaret
Esthappan, Sino
Reginal, Travis
Leitson, David

This report documents evaluation findings of NYC Justice Corps, a workforce readiness and recidivism reduction program for justice-involved youth, and describes the strengths and challenges as perceived by program staff, participants, and stakeholders. The evaluation highlights what Justice Corps providers—and similar programs—might learn as they work to integrate the goals of education, employment, and cognitive and psychosocial development into program services and activities for justice-involved youth.

In and out of poverty: Episodic poverty and income volatility in the US financial diaries

Individual Author: 
Morduch, Jonathan
Siwicki, Julie

We use data from the US Financial Diaries study to relate episodic poverty to intrayear income volatility and to the availability of government transfers. The US Financial Diaries data track a continuous year’s worth of month-to-month income for 235 low- and moderate-income households, each with at least one employed member, in four regions in the United States. The data provide an unusually granular view of household financial transactions, allowing the documentation of episodic poverty and the attribution of a large share of it to fluctuations in earnings within jobs.

Implementation and relative impacts of two job search assistance programs in New York City

Individual Author: 
Martinson, Karin
Harvill, Eleanor
Litwok, Daniel
Schwartz, Deena
De La Rosa, Siobhan Mills
Saunders, Correne
Bell, Stephen

This report describes the implementation and impact study findings from an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of two approaches to providing job search assistance (JSA) to cash assistance applicants in New York City. From 2015 to 2016, the New York City Department of Social Services/Human Resources Administration administered two JSA programs for “job ready” cash assistance applicants: Back to Work (known as B2W, the pre-existing program) and Independent Job Search (IJS, a new program).

“We get a chance to show impact": Program staff reflect on participating in a rigorous, multi-site evaluation

Individual Author: 
Hamadyk, Jill
Gardiner, Karen

This brief summarizes the experiences of leaders and staff from eight career pathways programs that participated in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation. Based on firsthand accounts, the brief describes how staff perceived the benefits of participating in the randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluation, the challenges they experienced—in particular recruiting study participants and implementing its random assignment procedures—and how they overcame challenges. The brief then describes lessons staff learned from participating in PACE.