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Oklahoma City

Reengaging disconnected youth action kit

Individual Author: 
Johnson, Alicia

An estimated 2.8 million Americans between the ages of 16 and 24 are neither in school nor employed. In many big cities, up to one-fourth of all young adults can be characterized as “disconnected.” The problem is also severe in rural communities located in high-poverty areas, a pattern that is vividly illustrated by the disproportionate number of minority youth in the South who fall into this category.

The long-term effects of Building Strong Families: A relationship skills education program for unmarried parents, technical supplement

Individual Author: 
Moore, Quinn
Wood, Robert G.
Clarkwest, Andrew
Killewald, Alexandra
Monahan, Shannon

This report is a technical supplement to the 36-month impact report for the Building Strong Families (BSF) evaluation (Wood et al. 2012). It provides additional detail about the research design, analytic methods, and variable construction that were used for the 36-month analysis, as well as a discussion of the subgroup analysis that was conducted. Additionally, the report discusses the treatment-on-the-treated (TOT) impact analysis, an analysis of BSF’s effects on couples who actually attended BSF group sessions.

The Supporting Healthy Marriage evaluation: A family-strengthening program for low-income families: Final impacts from the Supporting Healthy Marriage evaluation, Technical supplement

Individual Author: 
Lowenstein, Amy E.
Altman, Noemi
Chou, Patricia M.
Faucetta, Kristen
Greeney, Adam
Gubits, Daniel
Harris, Jorgen
Hsueh, JoAnn
Lundquist, Erika
Michalopoulos, Charles
Nguyen, Vinh Q.

This technical supplement to the evaluation’s 30-month final impact report provides additional details about the study’s research design, data sources, measures construction, outcome and subgroup measures, analytic approach, and sensitivity and robustness tests of the impact estimates.  It also presents supplemental analyses of impacts by program and subgroup and on additional child, parenting and adult outcomes. (author abstract)

Do the effects of a relationship education program vary for different types of couples? Exploratory subgroup analysis in the Supporting Healthy Marriage evaluation

Individual Author: 
Gubits, Daniel
Lowenstein, Amy
Harris, Jorgen
Hsueh, JoAnn

The Supporting Healthy Marriage (SHM) evaluation was launched in 2003 to test the effectiveness of a skills-based relationship education program designed to help low-and modest-income married couples strengthen their relationships and to support more stable and more nurturing home environments and more positive outcomes for parents and their children. The evaluation was led by MDRC with Abt Associates and other partners, and it was sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation in the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The Supporting Healthy Marriage evaluation: A family-strengthening program for low-income families: Final impacts from the Supporting Healthy Marriage evaluation

Individual Author: 
Lundquist, Erika
Hsueh, JoAnn
Lowenstein, Amy E.
Faucetta, Kristen
Gubits, Daniel
Michalopoulos, Charles
Knox, Virginia

This report provides an overview of the Supporting Healthy Marriage program model and includes final (30-month) impact findings on a range of outcomes including marital stability, relationship quality, co-parenting, and adult and child well-being. The report indicates that the program did not increase the likelihood that couples stayed together. The program did produce small positive effects in the relationship quality domain, but it did not improve co-parenting or measurably benefit children.

Mobilizing communities: An overview of the Community Coalition Partnership Program for the Prevention of Teen Pregnancy

Individual Author: 
Cassell, Carol
Santelli, John
Gilbert, Brenda C.
Dalmat, Michael
Mezoff, Jane
Schauer, Mary

The Community Coalition Partnership Programs for the Prevention of Teen Pregnancy (CCPP) was a seven-year (1995–2002) demonstration program funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Reproductive Health conducted in 13 U.S cities. The purpose of the CCPP was to demonstrate whether community partners could mobilize and organize community resources in support of comprehensive, effective, and sustainable programs for the prevention of initial and subsequent pregnancies.

The Building Strong Families project: The long-term effects of building strong families: A relationship skills education program for unmarried parents

Individual Author: 
Wood, Robert G.
Moore, Quinn
Clarkwest, Andrew
Killewald, Alexandra
Monahan, Shannon

The Building Strong Families (BSF) evaluation assessed the impacts of eight programs offering a similar model of healthy marriage and relationship skills and support services to interested low-income unmarried parents around the time of the birth of a child.  While many unmarried parents live together when their children are born, their relationships are often tenuous and most end within a few years of the child’s birth.

Implementation of 'Within My Reach:' Providing a relationship awareness and communication skills program to TANF recipients in Oklahoma

Individual Author: 
Sparks, Anne

Through the Oklahoma Marriage Initiative and Oklahoma’s Department of Human Services, a relationship education program called Within My Reach is included in a week of orientation activities for new TANF (public assistance) clients.

Evaluating alternative Welfare-to-Work approaches: Two-year impacts for eleven programs

Individual Author: 
Freedman, Stephen
Friedlander, Daniel
Hamilton, Gayle
Rock, JoAnn
Mitchell, Marisa
Nudelman, Jodi
Schweder, Amanda
Storto, Laura

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of August 19961 ended the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, one of the nation’s principal safety nets for poor families.

Do mandatory Welfare-to-Work programs affect the well-being of children?

Individual Author: 
Hamilton, Gayle
Freedman, Stephen
McGroder, Sharon M.

Since its inception the primary goal of the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, as well as successor programs funded under Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), has been to provide government support for poor children. Over the years, this public assistance has become more and more predicated on custodial parents' involvement in work or mandatory welfare-to-work program activities, as policymakers have sought to balance the goal of fostering poor children's well-being with that of encouraging adults' self-sufficiency.