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American Psychological Association

Publisher ID: 
SSRC-DID-0002636
Country: 

Parenting in poverty: Attention bias and anxiety interact to predict parents’ perceptions of daily parenting hassles

Individual Author: 
Finegood, Eric D.
Raver, C. Cybele
DeJoseph, Meriah L.
Blair, Clancy

Research has long acknowledged the centrality of parents’ subjective experiences in the caregiving role for the organization of parenting behaviors and family functioning. Recent scientific advances in cognitive process models and in the neurobiology of parenting indicate that parenting is shaped in part by conscious and nonconscious cognitive processes.

Effects of an early literacy professional development intervention on Head Start teachers and children

Individual Author: 
Powell, Douglas R.
Diamond, Karen E.
Burchinal, Margaret R.
Koehler, Matthew J.

Effects of a 1-semester professional development (PD) intervention that included expert coaching with Head Start teachers were investigated in a randomized controlled trial with 88 teachers and 759 children. Differential effects of technologically mediated (remote) versus in-person (on-site) delivery of individualized coaching with teachers also were examined in a random assignment design.

Associations between publicly funded preschool and low-income children’s kindergarten readiness: The moderating role of child temperament

Individual Author: 
Johnson, Anna D.
Finch, Jenna E.
Phillips, Deborah A.

Publicly funded center-based preschool programs were designed to enhance low-income children’s early cognitive and social-emotional skills in preparation for kindergarten. In the U.S., the federal Head Start program and state-funded public school–based pre-kindergarten (pre-k) programs are the two primary center-based settings in which low-income children experience publicly funded preschool.

Understanding the link between racial trauma and substance use among American Indians

Individual Author: 
Skewes, Monica C.
Blume, Arthur W.

Historians and scholars from various disciplines have documented the pervasive influence of racism on American society and culture, including effects on the health and well-being of American Indian (AI) people. Among the many health problems affected by racial discrimination and oppression, both historical and current, are substance use disorders. Epidemiological studies have documented greater drug and alcohol-related morbidity and mortality among AI/AN Alaska Natives compared to other ethnic groups, and culturally appropriate, effective interventions are sorely needed.

Positive parenting, family cohesion, and child social competence among immigrant Latino families

Individual Author: 
Leidy, Melinda S.
Guerra, Nancy G.
Toro, Rosa I.

The relation between positive parenting, family cohesion, and child social competence was examined among Latino families (predominantly from Mexico) who were recent immigrants to the United States. A mixed method study was conducted, including both pre- and post-test self-reported surveys (9-month interval) and qualitative data from focus groups. A total of 282 parents and 282 children (ages 9–12) participated in the survey study.

Enhancing home-based child care quality through video-feedback intervention: A randomized controlled trial

Individual Author: 
Groeneveld, MG
Vermeer, HJ
van Ijzendoorn, MH
Linting, M.

In the present randomized controlled trial, the effectiveness of video-feedback intervention to promote positive parenting–child care (VIPP-CC) was tested in home-based child care. Forty-eight caregivers were randomly assigned either to the intervention group or to the control group. Global child care quality improved in the intervention group but not in the control group. The program did not change observed caregiver sensitivity.

Pathways to paternal engagement: Longitudinal effects of risk and resilience on nonresident fathers

Individual Author: 
Fagan, Jay
Roy, Kevin
Palkovitz, Rob
Farrie, Danielle

This article assesses the longitudinal effects of risk and resilience on unmarried nonresident fathers’ engagement with children across the first 3 years of their lives. The authors used a subsample of 549 men from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study who were unmarried and noncohabiting at the time of the child’s birth. They found not only that risk and resilience factors had a direct effect on paternal engagement but also that their association with engagement was mediated by fathers’ continued nonresidence and mother–father relationship quality.

Hostility, relationship quality, and health among African American couples

Individual Author: 
Guyll, Max
Cutrona, Carolyn
Burzette, Rebecca
Russell, Daniel

This study investigated the association between hostility and health and whether it is moderated by the quality of an individual’s primary romantic relationship. Method: Longitudinal data were provided by 184 African Americans, including 166 women. Participants averaged 38 years old and were married or in long-term marriage like relationships. Hostility and relationship quality were measured at the first assessment. Hostility was based on participants’ responses to items tapping cynical attitudes about relationships.

The salience and severity of relationship problems among low-income couples

Individual Author: 
Jackson, Grace L.
Trail, Thomas E.
Kennedy, David P.
Williamson, Hannah C.
Bradbury, Thomas N.
Karney, Benjamin R.

Developing programs to support low-income married couples requires an accurate understanding of the challenges they face. To address this question, we assessed the salience and severity of relationship problems by asking 862 Black, White, and Latino newlywed spouses (N=431 couples) living in low-income neighborhoods to (a) free list their 3 biggest sources of disagreement in the marriage, and (b) rate the severity of the problems appearing on a standard relationship problem inventory.

The salience and severity of relationship problems among low-income couples

Individual Author: 
Jackson, Grace L.
Trail, Thomas E.
Kennedy, David P.
Williamson, Hannah C.
Bradbury, Thomas N.
Karney, Benjamin R.

Developing programs to support low-income married couples requires an accurate understanding of the challenges they face. To address this question, we assessed the salience and severity of relationship problems by asking 862 Black, White, and Latino newlywed spouses (N = 431 couples) living in low-income neighborhoods to (a) free list their 3 biggest sources of disagreement in the marriage, and (b) rate the severity of the problems appearing on a standard relationship problem inventory.