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Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin

Publisher ID: 
SSRC-DID-0001989
Country: 

Final implementation findings from the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CPSED) evaluation

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Meyer, Daniel R.
Wood, Robert

The final implementation report on the National Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) was released on January 15, 2019. It reflects demonstration activities that commenced in fall 2012, when the eight child support agencies competitvely awarded grants by OSCE to participate in CSPED began a one-year planning period, and concluded with the end of the demonstration period in September 2017. 

Characteristics of participants in the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) evaluation

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Guarin, Angela
Hodges, Leslie
Meyer, Daniel R.

The purpose of this report is to begin to fill in the blanks by documenting the characteristics of more than 10,000 noncustodial parents who participated in the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration program (CSPED).  The federally funded intervention was operated by child support agency grantees within eight eligible states, and served noncustodial parents who were behind on child support payments and experiencing employment difficulties. (Author introduction)

Final impact findings from the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED)

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Meyer, Daniel R.
Wood, Robert G.

The final impact report on the National Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) was released on March 14, 2019. The primary goal of the intervention was to improve the reliable payment of child support in order to improve child well-being and avoid public costs. Key outcomes related to noncustodial parents' (1) child support orders, payments and compliance, as well as attitudes toward the child support program; (2) work and earnings; (3) sense of responsibility for their children.

Child poverty in rural America

Individual Author: 
Rothwell, David
Thiede, Brian C.

More than one in four rural children live in a family with income below the official poverty line in 2013, compared to one in five in 1999. Possible reasons for this rise in rural poverty include changes in family composition, educational attainment, labor markets, and changes to social welfare policies. The social welfare system in the United States, comprising the full array of income transfers, tax credits, and other benefits available to those in need, was designed to offset economic hardship.

Wisconsin poverty report: Progress against poverty stalls in 2016

Individual Author: 
Smeeding, Timothy M.
Thornton, Katherine A.

Although overall employment expanded in Wisconsin during the period of this report, poverty as measured by the Wisconsin Poverty Measure (WPM) increased. In fact, overall poverty rates in Wisconsin rose significantly in 2016, to 10.8 percent compared to 9.7 in 2015. Market income poverty (which reflects employment levels and is therefore a helpful gauge of economic health) also rose slightly, even as jobs expanded.

The opioid epidemic and socioeconomic disadvantage

Individual Author: 
Institute for Research on Poverty

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officially declared an opioid epidemic in 2011, and the problem has continued to grow; President Trump declared it a public health emergency in October 2017. Between 2000 and 2015, more than half a million people died from opioid overdose, half of which were from prescription (as opposed to illicit) drugs. In 2016, opioid overdose killed 91 Americans every day, more than 64,000 people by year’s end—almost double the deaths in 2015.

Suburban poverty

Individual Author: 
Maher, Will

When many Americans think of poverty, decaying urban areas and neglected rural pockets come to mind. However, in the last 20 years, the geography of American poverty has shifted, with an increasing number of America’s poor people now living in suburbs. (Author abstract)

No place to call home: Child & youth homelessness in the United States

Individual Author: 
Damron, Neil

In 2013, over 1.2 million children in the United States were identified as homeless. In Wisconsin, the figure was 18,000. Research shows that homeless youth face barriers to education and are more likely to experience heath issues. So what has been done to solve this problem up until now and what are research-informed policy options for the future? (Author abstract)

The middle-class safety net in the great recession: Unemployment insurance and supplemental nutrition assistance working together

Individual Author: 
Wiseman, Michael

Transformation of the Food Stamp Program (FSP) into a near-universal system of food-oriented income support renamed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was arguably the most significant development in American social policy during the first decade of the new millennium.