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SAGE Publications

Publisher ID: 
SSRC-DID-0001924
Country: 

Impact of Baltimore Healthy Eating Zones: An environmental intervention to improve diet among African American youth

Individual Author: 
Shin, Ahyoung
Surkan, Pamela J.
Coutinho, Anastasia J.
Suratkar, Sonali R.
Campbell, Rebecca K.
Rowan, Megan
Sharma, Sangita
Dennisuk, Lauren A.
Karlsen, Micaela
Gass, Anthony
Gittelsohn, Joel

This study assessed the impact of a youth-targeted multilevel nutrition intervention in Baltimore City. The study used a clustered randomized design in which 7 recreation centers and 21 corner stores received interventions and 7 additional recreation centers served as comparison. The 8-month intervention aimed to increase availability and selection of healthful foods through nutrition promotion and education using point-of purchase materials such as posters and flyers in stores and interactive sessions such as taste test and cooking demonstrations.

Disparity of SED recovery: Community initiatives to enhance a system of care mental health transformation

Individual Author: 
Grape, Annette
Plum, Kathleen C.
Fielding, Stephen L.

How do youth from various community groups designated as having a serious emotional disturbance (SED) recover over time? We conducted an evaluation of a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration System of Care grant initiative for Monroe County, New York, to answer this and other questions. We looked at outcome differences over time using the Behavioral and Emotional Ratings Scale’s (2nd ed.) overall strength scores among youth living in four geographical places at the start of services: high-income urban, low-income urban, suburban, and rural.

Adolescent physical activity: Role of school support, role models, and social participation in racial and income disparities

Individual Author: 
Babey, Susan H.
Wolstein, Joelle
Diamant, Allison L.

Few youth meet current physical activity recommendations. Protective social factors such as having a role model, social participation, and adult support at school may help promote youth physical activity. This study used data from the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey to examine the extent to which role models, social participation, and support at school promote physical activity among groups at risk of inactivity and obesity, specifically low-income youth and youth of color.

Psychosocial stressors and health behaviors: Examining sleep, sedentary behaviors, and physical activity in a low-income pediatric sample

Individual Author: 
Lundahl, Alyssa
Nelson, Timothy D.
Van Dyk, Tori R.
West, Tiffany

Objective. To better understand the relationship between psychosocial stressors and health behaviors in a low-income pediatric sample. Method. Participants were 122 children (8-11 years old, 53.3% female) and their parents recruited from a low-income primary care clinic. Measures assessed child stressors and parental financial strain, and child sleep problems, sedentary behaviors, and physical activity. Results. Parental financial strain and child stressors were independently associated with sleep problems and sedentary behaviors, controlling for age and gender.

Health and eating behavior differs between lean/normal and overweight/obese low-income women living in food-insecure environments

Individual Author: 
Dressler, Heidi
Smith, Chery

 

Purpose.

To explore differences and similarities in environmental, personal, and behavioral factors influencing eating behavior among low-income women of varying weight status.

Design.

Focus groups (n = 16) were used to collect qualitative data. Quantitative data collected included demographic, lifestyle, and anthropometric (heights and weights).

Setting.

Community centers, libraries, and homeless shelters in low-income neighborhoods.

Participants.

Lessons learned from a community-based participatory research mental health promotion program for American Indian youth

Individual Author: 
Langdon, Sarah E.
Golden, Shannon L.
Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield
Maynor, Rhonda F.
Bryant, Alfred
Freeman, V. Kay
Bell, Ronny A.

Background. American Indian (AI) youth have the highest rates of suicide among racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States. Community-based strategies are essential to address this issue, and community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers a model to engage AI communities in mental health promotion programming. Objectives.

Maternal monitoring knowledge change and adolescent externalizing behaviors in low-income African American and Latino families

Individual Author: 
Chang, Tzu-Fen
Baolian Qin, Desiree

Drawing on a sample of 318 African American and 354 Latino urban, low-income families, we identify maternal monitoring knowledge trajectories and examine which trajectory predicts fewer late-adolescent externalizing problems and which family and neighborhood factors predict trajectories with positive implications for lateadolescent externalizing behaviors. The majority of adolescents in both groups perceived long-term high levels of maternal monitoring knowledge throughout adolescence—stably high for the African American sample and high for the Latino sample.

Long-term effects of social-emotional learning on receipt of special education and grade retention: Evidence from a randomized trial of INSIGHTS

Individual Author: 
McCormick, Meghan P.
Neuhaus, Robin
Horn, E. Parham
O'Connor, Erin E.
White, Hope S.
Harding, Samantha
Cappella, Elise
McClowry, Sandee

Social–Emotional Learning (SEL) programs are school-based preventive interventions that aim to improve children’s social–emotional skills and behavioral development. Although meta-analytic research has shown that SEL programs can improve academic and behavioral outcomes in the short term, few studies have examined program effects on receipt of special education services and grade retention in the longer term.

Are Hispanic, Asian, Native American, or language-minority children overrepresented in special education?

Individual Author: 
Morgan, Paul L.
Farkas, George
Cook, Michael
Strassfeld, Natasha M.
Hillemeier, Marianne M.
Pun, Wik Hung
Wang, Yangyang
Schussler, Deborah L.

We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2%), 14/208 (6.7%), 2/37 (5.4%), and 6/91 (6.6%) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively.

Withdrawal, attachment security, and recovery from conflict in couple relationships

Individual Author: 
Prager, Karen J.
Poucher, Jesse
Shirvani, Forouz K.
Parsons, Julie A.
Allam, Zoheb

This study used 115 cohabiting couple partners’ 21-day diaries, with which they reported each evening on their moods and their relationships, to test hypotheses about connections between withdrawal following conflict, attachment insecurity, and affective recovery from conflict (i.e., post-conflict relationship satisfaction, positive and negative mood, and intimacy). Individuals reported on their own and their partners’ post-conflict withdrawals.