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African American-Black

Notes from the storm: Black immigrant domestic workers in the time of COVID-19

Individual Author: 
Bayard, Marc
Freeman Brown, Kimberly

Black immigrant domestic workers are at the epicenter of three converging storms—the pandemic, the resulting economic depression, and structural racism. Intersectional identities such as Black, immigrant, woman, and low-wage worker make these essential workers some of the most invisible and vulnerable workers in our country.

Pay, professionalism, and respect black domestic workers continue the call for standards in the care industry

Individual Author: 
Bayard, Marc
Freeman Brown, Kimberly

Pay, Professionalism & Respect is a two-volume report detailing the history and current challenges facing black nannies, home care workers, and house cleaners in Atlanta, GA, and Durham, NC, such as systemically low wages, rampant sexual harassment, and a lack of benefits. It also details policy recommendations and reforms that are needed to transform the entire care industry, which is one of the fastest growing in the country.

In a city-wide survey of 101 Black domestic workers in Durham, we found:

Pay, professionalism, and respect black domestic workers continue the call for standards in the care industry

Individual Author: 
Bayard, Marc
Freeman Brown, Kimberly

Pay, Professionalism & Respect is a two-volume report detailing the history and current challenges facing black nannies, home care workers, and house cleaners in Atlanta, GA, and Durham, NC, such as systemically low wages, rampant sexual harassment, and a lack of benefits. It also details policy recommendations and reforms that are needed to transform the entire care industry, which is one of the fastest growing in the country.

In a city-wide survey of 49 Black domestic workers in Atlanta, we found:

Ten solutions to bridge the racial wealth divide

Individual Author: 
Asante-Muhammad, Dedrick
Collins, Chuck
Hamilton, Darrick
Hoxie, Josh

The deep and persistent racial wealth divide will not close without bold, structural reform. It has been created and held in place by public policies that have evolved with time including slavery, Jim Crow, red lining, mass incarceration, among many others. The racial wealth divide is greater today than it was nearly four decades ago and trends point to its continued widening

2021 poverty projections: Assessing the impact of benefits and stimulus measures

Individual Author: 
Wheaton, Laura
Giannarelli, Linda
Dehry, Ilham

In an earlier brief, we estimated that the American Rescue Plan Act, enacted in March 2021, would reduce the 2021 annual poverty rate to 8.7 percent (Wheaton et al. 2021). We now project a 2021 poverty rate of 7.7 percent for 2021. The revised projection accounts for improvements in the economy, incorporates updated state-level information on pandemic-related policies, and improves the method for weighting the data to reflect 2021.

Filling the Medicaid gap with a public option

Individual Author: 
Holahan, John
Simpson, Michael

As of July 2021, 12 states have not expanded Medicaid as permitted by the Affordable Care Act,  contributing to 5.8 million people with incomes below the federal poverty level being without coverage. One approach to help cover people in this “Medicaid gap” would be to have the federal government make Marketplace coverage available to those between current Medicaid eligibility levels and  the federal poverty level. An alternative would be to employ a public option plan in the Marketplace to for the same population.

What would it take to reduce inequities in healthy life expectancy?

Individual Author: 
Kenney, Genevieve M.
Waidmann, Timothy
Skope, Laura
Allen, Eva H.

What if everyone had the same prospects for living a long and healthy life, no matter who they are or where they call home? In this future, all people live in safe and healthy environments; enjoy reliable access to health care, nutritious food, and stable housing; and have the knowledge and opportunities to make healthy choices about diet and exercise. And none of us has to contend with the harms of persistent racial discrimination, violence, trauma, and injustice.

Creating moves to opportunity: Experimental evidence on barriers to neighborhood choice

Individual Author: 
Bergman, Peter
Chetty, Raj
DeLuca, Stefanie
Hendren, Nathaniel
Katz, Lawrence
Palmer, Christopher

Low-income families in the United States tend to live in neighborhoods that offer limited opportunities for upward income mobility. One potential explanation for this pattern is that low-income families prefer such neighborhoods for other reasons, such as affordability or proximity to family and jobs. An alternative explanation is that families do not move to high-opportunity areas because of barriers that prevent them from making such moves.