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American Indian/Alaskan Native/Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander

COVID-19: Global health equity in pandemic response

Individual Author: 
Ivers, Louise C.
Walton, David A.

As the world struggles with the rapidly evolving pandemic of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), evidence and experience suggest that low-income and marginalized communities in our global society will bear the biggest impact. Weknow this because, with our colleagues in Boston, Haiti, Uganda, and Sierra Leone, we have worked in under-resourced, overstretched, and overwhelmed health systems for our whole careers.

The COVID-19 pandemic Is straining families’ abilities to afford basic needs: Low-income and Hispanic families the hardest hit

Individual Author: 
Karpman, Michael
Zuckerman, Stephen
Gonzalez, Dulce
Kenney, Genevieve M.

As it confronts the COVID-19 pandemic, the US faces what could be its worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. A successful government response to the economic consequences of the pandemic is critical for sustaining families’ health and well-being and allowing families to remain housed as major sectors of the economy remain closed. The success of this response will partly depend on its effectiveness in reaching the families hardest hit by the loss of jobs and incomes.

More than a nice thing to do: A practice-based evidence approach to outcome evaluation in Native youth and family programs

Individual Author: 
Friesen, Barbara J.
Cross, Terry L.
Jivanjee, Pauline R.
Gowen, Kris
Bandurraga, Abby
Bastomski, Sara
Mathew, Cori
Maher, Nichole June

This chapter describes the activities and results of a practice-based evidence project designed to develop a framework for culturally responsive effectiveness evaluation within a community agency serving urban American Indian and Alaska Native youth and families.

Lessons learned from a community-based participatory research mental health promotion program for American Indian youth

Individual Author: 
Langdon, Sarah E.
Golden, Shannon L.
Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield
Maynor, Rhonda F.
Bryant, Alfred
Freeman, V. Kay
Bell, Ronny A.

Background. American Indian (AI) youth have the highest rates of suicide among racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States. Community-based strategies are essential to address this issue, and community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers a model to engage AI communities in mental health promotion programming. Objectives.

Integrating motivational interviewing and traditional practices to address alcohol and drug use among urban American Indian/Alaska Native youth

Individual Author: 
Dickerson, Daniel L.
Brown, Ryan A.
Johnson, Carrie L.
Schweigman, Kurt
D'Amico, Elizabeth J.

American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) exhibit high levels of alcohol and drug (AOD) use and problems. Although approximately 70% of AI/ANs reside in urban areas, few culturally relevant AOD use programs targeting urban AI/AN youth exist. Furthermore, federally-funded studies focused on the integration of evidence-based treatments with AI/AN traditional practices are limited.

Innovations in financial capability: Culturally responsive & multigenerational wealth building practices in Asian Pacific Islander (API) communities

Individual Author: 
Lovejoy, Meg
Santos, Jessica
Vo, Angela

The Innovations in Financial Capability report is a collaborative report by the National CAPACD and the Institute of Assets and Social Policy (IASP) at Brandeis University's Heller School for Social Policy and Management, in partnership with Hawaiian Community Assets (HCA), and the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement (CNHA). The survey report builds upon the 2017 report Foundations for the Future: Empowerment Economics in the Native Hawaiian Context and features the financial capability work of over 40 of our member organizations and other AAPI serving organizations from across the US.

Are Hispanic, Asian, Native American, or language-minority children overrepresented in special education?

Individual Author: 
Morgan, Paul L.
Farkas, George
Cook, Michael
Strassfeld, Natasha M.
Hillemeier, Marianne M.
Pun, Wik Hung
Wang, Yangyang
Schussler, Deborah L.

We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2%), 14/208 (6.7%), 2/37 (5.4%), and 6/91 (6.6%) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively.

A year in Region XI Head Start: Children’s growth and development from the American Indian and Alaska Native Family and Child Experiences Survey 2015 (AI/AN FACES 2015)

Individual Author: 
Bernstein, Sara
Malone, Lizabeth
AI/AN FACES 2015 Workgroup

It is important for Head Start to have information about children’s and families’ strengths and needs over the course of the program year. We examine Region XI Head Start children’s growth in cognitive skills (in language, literacy, and mathematics), social-emotional skills, and executive function during the program year to learn about their progress toward being ready for school.

Understanding barriers to initial treatment engagement among underserved families seeking mental health services

Individual Author: 
Ofonedu, Mirian E.
Belcher, Harolyn M. E.
Budhathoki, Chakra
Gross, Deborah A.

This mixed method study examined factors associated with parents not attending their child’s mental health treatment after initially seeking help for their 2–5 year old child. It was part of a larger study comparing two evidence-based treatments among low-income racial/ethnic minority families seeking child mental health services. Of 123 parents who initiated mental health treatment (71 % African American or multi-racial; 97.6 % low-income), 36 (29.3 %) never attended their child’s first treatment session.

Incorporating traditional culture into positive youth development programs with American Indian/Alaska Native youth

Individual Author: 
Kenyon, DenYelle Baete
Hanson, Jessica D.

The majority of research and programs for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth focus on negative health behaviors and risks, ignoring the positive attributes that traditional AI/AN culture can provide. Therefore, it is critical to highlight the importance of incorporating traditional AI/AN worldviews and values into youth programming and health interventions.