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Immigrants

Notes from the storm: Black immigrant domestic workers in the time of COVID-19

Individual Author: 
Bayard, Marc
Freeman Brown, Kimberly

Black immigrant domestic workers are at the epicenter of three converging storms—the pandemic, the resulting economic depression, and structural racism. Intersectional identities such as Black, immigrant, woman, and low-wage worker make these essential workers some of the most invisible and vulnerable workers in our country.

2021 poverty projections: Assessing the impact of benefits and stimulus measures

Individual Author: 
Wheaton, Laura
Giannarelli, Linda
Dehry, Ilham

In an earlier brief, we estimated that the American Rescue Plan Act, enacted in March 2021, would reduce the 2021 annual poverty rate to 8.7 percent (Wheaton et al. 2021). We now project a 2021 poverty rate of 7.7 percent for 2021. The revised projection accounts for improvements in the economy, incorporates updated state-level information on pandemic-related policies, and improves the method for weighting the data to reflect 2021.

Filling the Medicaid gap with a public option

Individual Author: 
Holahan, John
Simpson, Michael

As of July 2021, 12 states have not expanded Medicaid as permitted by the Affordable Care Act,  contributing to 5.8 million people with incomes below the federal poverty level being without coverage. One approach to help cover people in this “Medicaid gap” would be to have the federal government make Marketplace coverage available to those between current Medicaid eligibility levels and  the federal poverty level. An alternative would be to employ a public option plan in the Marketplace to for the same population.

Progress in achieving health equity requires attention to root causes

Individual Author: 
Woolf, Steven H.

Life expectancy and disease rates in the United States differ starkly among Americans depending on their demographic characteristics and where they live. Although health care systems are taking important steps to reduce inequities, meaningful progress requires interventions outside the clinic, in sectors such as employment, housing, transportation, and public safety. Inequities exist in each of these sectors, and barriers to educational attainment, higher-income jobs, and social mobility limit the opportunity of disadvantaged people to improve their circumstances.

COVID-19 and refugee and immigrant youth: A community-based mental health perspective

Individual Author: 
Birman, Dina
Endale, Tarik
St. Jean, Nicole

In this article, we comment on the experience of the Kovler Center Child Trauma Program (KCCTP) following the March 21, 2020, shelter at home order in Chicago due to COVID-19. The KCCTP is a program of Heartland Alliance International that was founded in 2018 to provide community-based mental health and social services to immigrant and refugee youth and families who have experienced trauma. COVID-19 temporarily closed the doors of the center, suspending provision of in-person services in the community, and the program was forced to become remote overnight.

COVID-19: Global health equity in pandemic response

Individual Author: 
Ivers, Louise C.
Walton, David A.

As the world struggles with the rapidly evolving pandemic of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), evidence and experience suggest that low-income and marginalized communities in our global society will bear the biggest impact. Weknow this because, with our colleagues in Boston, Haiti, Uganda, and Sierra Leone, we have worked in under-resourced, overstretched, and overwhelmed health systems for our whole careers.

Resilience of children with refugee statuses: A research review

Individual Author: 
Pieloch, Kerrie A.
Marks, Amy K.
McCullough, Mary Beth

Over the past several decades, an increasing number of refugee children and families have involuntarily migrated to countries around the world to seek safety and refuge. As the refugee population increases, it is becoming more important to understand factors that promote and foster resilience among refugee youth. The present review examines the past 20 years of resilience research with refugee children to identify individual, family, school, community, and societal factors fostering resilience.

DACA uncertainty may undermine its positive impact on wellbeing

Individual Author: 
Patler, Caitlin
Hamilton, Erin
Savinar, Robin

Young, undocumented Latino immigrants face many challenges in the United States. Undocumented Latino youth are less likely to graduate from high school and attend college than native-born youth and are more likely to live in poverty and report clinical levels of depression. Our research examines the impact of changes in legal status related to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program on Latino immigrant young adults in California, with a focus on distress and psychological wellbeing.

What would help DC residents have greater financial security?

Individual Author: 
Elliott, Diana
Quakenbush, Caleb

Washington, DC, is a city of contrasts with respect to residents’ financial security. While some residents are among the country’s most financially secure, others find it hard to make ends meet. High housing costs, unequal opportunity, and economically segregated neighborhoods make it challenging for some residents to feel financially secure and to weather unexpected expenses and emergencies.