Skip to main content
Back to Top

 

Incarcerated

Incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals: Ongoing research and program evaluation efforts

Individual Author: 
Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

Several programs within the Administration for Children and Families work with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals in an effort to promote economic self-sufficiency and social well-being for them and their families. As a part of that work, we also implement rigorous research and evaluation projects designed to improve our understanding of how best to serve these individuals. This brief highlights and describes these projects. (author abstract)

The impact of incarceration on families, communities, and offenders webinar question and answer document

Individual Author: 
Wilson-Simmons, Reneé
Tyner, Artika
Moore, Kristin

On March 26, 2015 from 2:00-3:00pm EDT, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted The Impact of Incarceration on Families, Communities, and Offenders Webinar, featuring SSRC Emerging Scholar Dr. Artika Tyner with Dr. Renée Wilson-Simmons as a discussant and Dr. Kristin Anderson Moore as moderator. This Webinar focused on the social and economic impacts of incarceration on children, families, communities, and offenders. Dr.

The impact of incarceration on families, communities, and offenders webinar transcript

Individual Author: 
Wilson-Simmons, Reneé
Tyner, Artika
Moore, Kristin

On March 26, 2015 from 2:00-3:00pm EDT, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted The Impact of Incarceration on Families, Communities, and Offenders Webinar, featuring SSRC Emerging Scholar Dr. Artika Tyner with Dr. Renée Wilson-Simmons as a discussant and Dr. Kristin Anderson Moore as moderator. This Webinar focused on the social and economic impacts of incarceration on children, families, communities, and offenders. Dr.

The impact of incarceration on families, communities, and offenders webinar powerpoint presentation

Individual Author: 
Wilson-Simmons, Reneé
Tyner, Artika
Moore, Kristin

On March 26, 2015 from 2:00-3:00pm EDT, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted The Impact of Incarceration on Families, Communities, and Offenders Webinar, featuring SSRC Emerging Scholar Dr. Artika Tyner with Dr. Renée Wilson-Simmons as a discussant and Dr. Kristin Anderson Moore as moderator. This Webinar focused on the social and economic impacts of incarceration on children, families, communities, and offenders. Dr.

The implementation of family strengthening programs for families affected by incarceration

Individual Author: 
McKay, Tasseli
Lindquist, Christine
Corwin, Elise
Bir, Anupa

The Evaluation of the Marriage and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Reentering Fathers and their Partners (MFS-IP) is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) activities to support healthy marriage, responsible fatherhood, and successful re-entry from incarceration. Twelve grantees received funding for five years (2006-2011) from the Office of Family Assistance within the Administration for Children and Families to implement multiple activities to support and sustain marriages and families of fathers during and after incarceration.

National Fatherhood Initiative InsideOut Dad™ Program in Maryland and Ohio prisons evaluation report

Individual Author: 
Spain, Susan Kennedy

This report gives an overview of the InsideOut Dad™ Program and discusses the results of a third-party evaluation of the program as offered at six Maryland correctional institutions and eight Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction Institutions. Evaluators analyzed pre and post survey data from 219 program participants and found that the program had a positive effect on participants’ fathering knowledge and attitudes.

Assessing the impact of InsideOut Dad™ on Newark Community Education Centers (CEC) Residential Reentry Center residents

Individual Author: 
Economic Development Research Group

This report presents a multi-method evaluation of the InsideOut Dad™ program in three Community Education Centers (CEC) Residential Reentry Centers in New Jersey. The current evaluation includes both quantitative and qualitative data in the form of participant surveys, institutional data collection, participant interviews, and stakeholder interviews. These methods are used to determine if the program has had an impact across a series of outcome measures...

Report on Prisoner Reentry Project: Analysis of 24/7 Dad pre- and post-test results

Individual Author: 
da Rosa, Grace D.
Melby, Janet N.

Excerpt from Executive Summary of Report: This report was prepared for the Iowa Department of Human Services, Bureau of Collections and Child Support Recovery Unit through a contract with the Child Welfare Research and Training Project within the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at Iowa State University. Data for this report were collected from three sites (Ames, Marshalltown and Mason City) from 2010 to 2012. Project participants were Iowa males under correctional supervision while participating in 24/7 Dad®, a program of the National Fatherhood Initiative.

The Oklahoma Marriage Initiative: Marriage and relationship skills education as a way to prepare prisoners for reintegration

Individual Author: 
Dion, M. Robin
Silman, Timothy
Strong, Debra A.
Santos, Betsy

This research brief presents the findings from a special emphasis in the process evaluation of the Oklahoma Marriage Initiative (OMI) on marriage education services within the state’s correctional system. The OMI is the nation’s longest running and most comprehensive set of state-wide programs to strengthen marriage and families and efforts to work with the Department of Corrections were begun early in the initiative.

Children of incarcerated parents: Theoretical developmental and clinical issues

Individual Author: 
Harris, Yvette R.
Graham, James A.
Carpenter, Gloria J. O.

This book serves as a comprehensive source for understanding and intervening with children of incarcerated parents. The text examines the daunting clinical implications inherent in trauma throughout development, as well as social and political roles in ameliorating intergenerational delinquency. This book conceptualizes the problem by using an ecological framework that is focused on the experience of the child.