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Two-parent Families

Long-term effects of parenting-focused preventive interventions to promote resilience of children and adolescents

Individual Author: 
Sandler, Irwin
Ingram, Alexandra
Wolchik, Sharlene
Tein, Jenn-Yun
Winslow, Emily

In this article, we address three questions concerning the long-term effects of parenting-focused preventive interventions: 1) Do prevention programs promote effective parenting in families facing normative stressors as well as those facing frequent adversity? 2) Do parenting programs prevent children’s long-term problems? 3) Do changes in parenting mediate long-term effects of programs? We address these questions by summarizing evidence from 22 programs with randomized trials and followups of three years or longer.

Missed housing and utility payments are common and persistent in the United States

Individual Author: 
Finnigan, Ryan
Meagher, Kelsey D.

Housing and utility costs consume the majority of monthly incomes for millions of families in the United States. Missed payments can result in penalties, utility shutoffs, and evictions. Between 14 and 16 percent of the U.S. population experiences utility and/or housing hardship each year, defined as the inability to make full and on-time payments. We found that utility hardship is more common and persistent than housing hardship. Households that experience only utility hardship are notably more disadvantaged than those with only housing hardship.

Access to food stamps improves children’s health and reduces medical spending

Individual Author: 
East, Chloe N.

The Food Stamp Program (FSP, known since 2008 as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP) is one of the largest safety-net programs in the United States. It is especially important for families with children. However, the FSP eligibility of documented immigrants has shifted on multiple occasions in recent decades. When I studied the health outcomes of children in documented immigrant families affected by such shifts between 1996 and 2003, I found that just one extra year of parental eligibility before age 5 improves health outcomes at ages 6-16.

Parenting aggravation associated with food insecurity impacts children’s behavior and development

Individual Author: 
Gee, Kevin
Asim, Minahil

Parents struggling with food insecurity can experience heightened levels of stress, anxiety, and depression. These pressures may negatively affect their parenting, which may in turn affect the behavior of their children. In this study, we investigated the parenting aggravation levels of parents who experienced food insecurity in the aftermath of the Great Recession. We also explored the extent to which such aggravation may be responsible for the link between food insecurity and children’s behaviors.

The co-development of parenting stress and childhood internalizing and externalizing problems

Individual Author: 
Stone, Lisanne L.
Mares, Suzanne H.W.
Otten, Roy
Engels, Rutger C.M.E.
Janssens, Jan M.A.M.

Although the detrimental influence of parenting stress on child problem behavior is well established, it remains unknown how these constructs affect each other over time. In accordance with a transactional model, this study investigates how the development of internalizing and externalizing problems is related to the development of parenting stress in children aged 4–9. Mothers of 1582 children participated in three one-year interval data waves. Internalizing and externalizing problems as well as parenting stress were assessed by maternal self-report.

The association of parent mindfulness with parenting and youth psychopathology across three developmental stages

Individual Author: 
Parent, Justin
McKee, Laura G.
Mahon, Jennifer
Foreh, Rex

The primary purpose of the current study was to test a model examining the process by which parent dispositional mindfulness relates to youth psychopathology through mindful parenting and parenting practices. The universality of the model across youth at three developmental stages was examined: young childhood (3 – 7 yrs.; n = 210), middle childhood (8 – 12 yrs.; n = 200), and adolescence (13 – 17 yrs.; n = 205). Overall, participants were 615 parents (55 % female) and one of their 3-to-17 year old children (45 % female).

Family structure and the well-being of immigrant children in four European countries

Individual Author: 
Kalmijn, Matthijs

Data on secondary school children in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden show that large differences exist in family structure within the minority population: In some groups, father absence is more common than among natives; in others, it is less common. These patterns reflect the differences in family structure in the origin countries, but the migration process also plays a role. Next, it is found that father absence has negative effects on immigrant children’s well-being, but these effects appear weaker in minority groups where father absence is more common.

Do changes to family structure affect child and family outcomes? A systematic review of the instability hypothesis

Individual Author: 
Hadfield, Kristin
Amos, Margaret
Ungar, Michael
Gosselin, Julie
Ganong, Lawrence

Many children experience multiple family transitions as their parents move into and out of romantic relationships. The instability hypothesis is a stress mediation model that suggests that family transitions cause stress and that this stress leads to worse developmental outcomes. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the evidence base for this hypothesis. Thirty-nine articles met the inclusion criteria. Most reports were secondary analyses of American longitudinal data sets.

Extended kin and children's behavioral functioning: Family structure and parental immigrant status

Individual Author: 
Kang, Jeehye
Cohen, Philip N.

Using the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A. FANS), this paper examines the association between the presence of co-resident extended kin and children's internalizing and externalizing behaviors. The paper demonstrates the differential role of extended kin by family structure, as well as across parental immigrant status – specifically, nativity and documentation status. Children in the sample were found to be disadvantaged in extended family households, especially with regard to internalizing behaviors.

Caregiver payments and the obligation to give care or share

Individual Author: 
Weiner, Merle H.

This article argues that parents should have a legal obligation to share fairly the caregiving responsibility for their children, regardless of whether the parents are married, unmarried, separated, or divorced. Every parent should be obligated “to give care or share,” i.e., to pay compensation to the other parent for any disproportionate and unfair caregiving that occurs. This general obligation should be imposed without delay, despite the fact that the legal solution will be untidy.