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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This report provides detailed summaries of major research investments by OPRE’s Division of Family Strengthening (DFS) along with brief overviews of past projects. The featured projects cover topics that include strengthening relationships within families, supporting fatherhood, nurturing children through their families, reducing teen pregnancy, supporting youth in their transition to adulthood, and preventing family violence. The report also describes DFS’s investments in activities to disseminate rigorous research on family strengthening topics to a diverse range of stakeholders including federal and state policy-makers, program administrators, researchers, and intermediary organizations. This report covers OPRE-funded projects through Fiscal Year 2014. (author abstract)

    This report provides detailed summaries of major research investments by OPRE’s Division of Family Strengthening (DFS) along with brief overviews of past projects. The featured projects cover topics that include strengthening relationships within families, supporting fatherhood, nurturing children through their families, reducing teen pregnancy, supporting youth in their transition to adulthood, and preventing family violence. The report also describes DFS’s investments in activities to disseminate rigorous research on family strengthening topics to a diverse range of stakeholders including federal and state policy-makers, program administrators, researchers, and intermediary organizations. This report covers OPRE-funded projects through Fiscal Year 2014. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Forster, Hilary; Rolston, Howard; Gueron, Judith; Haskins, Ron; Winstead, Don; Greenberg, Mark; Maynard, Rebecca
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    Welfare is often touted as the area where rigorous social science research has been most sustained and has had the clearest impact on policy. Roundtable panelists will reflect on the history of this research, discussing questions including: Why were randomized experiments sustained over 40 years? What questions did this research answer well? How did the research inform and influence legislation, policy, and practice at the national and state levels? To what extent are lessons relevant to social policy research today and to other fields? What can be done to promote such rigorous research? Rebecca Maynard (University of Pennsylvania) will moderate this session, and Mark Greenberg (Administration for Children and Families) will serve as a discussant. Panelists are:

    • Howard Rolston (Abt Associates)

    • Judith Gueron (Independent Scholar)

    • Ron Haskins (The Brookings Institution)

    • Don Winstead (Don Winstead Consulting, LLC) (conference program description)

    This presentation was given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

    Welfare is often touted as the area where rigorous social science research has been most sustained and has had the clearest impact on policy. Roundtable panelists will reflect on the history of this research, discussing questions including: Why were randomized experiments sustained over 40 years? What questions did this research answer well? How did the research inform and influence legislation, policy, and practice at the national and state levels? To what extent are lessons relevant to social policy research today and to other fields? What can be done to promote such rigorous research? Rebecca Maynard (University of Pennsylvania) will moderate this session, and Mark Greenberg (Administration for Children and Families) will serve as a discussant. Panelists are:

    • Howard Rolston (Abt Associates)

    • Judith Gueron (Independent Scholar)

    • Ron Haskins (The Brookings Institution)

    • Don Winstead (Don Winstead Consulting, LLC) (conference program description)

    This presentation was given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

  • Individual Author: Gilbertson, Lauren; Phelps, Ellen; Morrison, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    The presentation summarizes a study to examine which services child welfare agencies have trouble securing for children and families, how states use Title IV-B (of the Social Security Act) funds, and which other federal funding sources states also use for child welfare services.The presentation was based on the GAO's 2013 report titled Child Welfare: States Use Flexible Federal Funds, But Struggle to Meet Service Needs (GAO-13-170).

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    The presentation summarizes a study to examine which services child welfare agencies have trouble securing for children and families, how states use Title IV-B (of the Social Security Act) funds, and which other federal funding sources states also use for child welfare services.The presentation was based on the GAO's 2013 report titled Child Welfare: States Use Flexible Federal Funds, But Struggle to Meet Service Needs (GAO-13-170).

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Vandevire, Sharon; Malm, Karin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    One factor that may facilitate a successful reunification of children in foster care with their parents—or failing that, provide an alternate route to permanency through adoption or guardianship—is children’s connections with extended family. However, because foster care frequently disrupts social connections, practitioners may need to take extra steps to help children maintain or re-establish these connections. The Family Finding model provides child welfare practitioners with intensive search and engagement techniques to identify family members and other adults close to a child in foster care, and to involve these adults in developing and carrying out a plan for the emotional and legal permanency of the child. This report reviews the results from 13 evaluations of Family Finding that have been released over the past two years. (author abstract)

    One factor that may facilitate a successful reunification of children in foster care with their parents—or failing that, provide an alternate route to permanency through adoption or guardianship—is children’s connections with extended family. However, because foster care frequently disrupts social connections, practitioners may need to take extra steps to help children maintain or re-establish these connections. The Family Finding model provides child welfare practitioners with intensive search and engagement techniques to identify family members and other adults close to a child in foster care, and to involve these adults in developing and carrying out a plan for the emotional and legal permanency of the child. This report reviews the results from 13 evaluations of Family Finding that have been released over the past two years. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Covington, Reginald D.; Goesling, Brian; Clark Tuttle, Christina ; Crofton, Molly; Manlove, Jennifer; Oman, Roy F.; Vesely, Sara
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report presents the final impact findings from a large-scale demonstration project and evaluation of POWER Through Choices (PTC), a comprehensive sexual health education curriculum designed specifically for youth in foster care, the juvenile justice system, and other out-of-home care settings. Prior research indicates that youth in out-of-home care are at particularly high risk for teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and associated sexual risk behaviors (Dworsky and Courtney 2010). However, many of these youth report difficulty accessing reproductive health information and services (Freundlich 2003; Crottogini et al. 2008), as well as relatively low levels of knowledge about reproductive health and methods of protection (Hudson 2012). PTC is one of the only comprehensive sexual health education curricula designed to address the needs and risks specific to this population. (Author abstract)

    This report presents the final impact findings from a large-scale demonstration project and evaluation of POWER Through Choices (PTC), a comprehensive sexual health education curriculum designed specifically for youth in foster care, the juvenile justice system, and other out-of-home care settings. Prior research indicates that youth in out-of-home care are at particularly high risk for teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and associated sexual risk behaviors (Dworsky and Courtney 2010). However, many of these youth report difficulty accessing reproductive health information and services (Freundlich 2003; Crottogini et al. 2008), as well as relatively low levels of knowledge about reproductive health and methods of protection (Hudson 2012). PTC is one of the only comprehensive sexual health education curricula designed to address the needs and risks specific to this population. (Author abstract)

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