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COVID-19 and refugee and immigrant youth: A community-based mental health perspective

Individual Author: 
Birman, Dina
Endale, Tarik
St. Jean, Nicole

In this article, we comment on the experience of the Kovler Center Child Trauma Program (KCCTP) following the March 21, 2020, shelter at home order in Chicago due to COVID-19. The KCCTP is a program of Heartland Alliance International that was founded in 2018 to provide community-based mental health and social services to immigrant and refugee youth and families who have experienced trauma. COVID-19 temporarily closed the doors of the center, suspending provision of in-person services in the community, and the program was forced to become remote overnight.

Utilizing social-emotional learning supports to address teacher stress and preschool expulsion

Individual Author: 
Zinsser, Katherine M.
Zulauf, Courtney A.
Nair Das, Vinoadharen
Silver, H. Callie

Across the United States, rates of preschool expulsion exceed those in K-12 and relatively little is known of the antecedents and consequences of such disciplinary decisions for both teachers and children. Interventions to reduce expulsion from public preschool additionally benefit teachers' workplace experiences, including reducing stress. The present study explores associations among supports and resources which promote children's social and emotional learning (SEL), teacher stress, and requests for expulsions in community-based preschool classrooms.

Subsidized employment and social enterprise: Findings from recent RCTs

Individual Author: 
Bloom, Dan
Maxwell, Nan
Keesling, Gregg
Rotz, Dana

This presentation was given at the 57th National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Workshop in 2019. Moderated by Mike Fishman, this presentation provides an overview of the results of studies comparing the work rates of formal versus subsidized employment and the impact of social enterprise on subsidized employment.

Strained suburbs: The social service challenges of rising suburban poverty

Individual Author: 
Allard, Scott W.
Roth, Benjamin

Cities and suburbs occupy well-defined roles within the discussion of poverty, opportunity, and social welfare policy in metropolitan America. Research exploring issues of poverty typically has focused on central-city neighborhoods, where poverty and joblessness have been most concentrated. As a result, place-based U.S. antipoverty policies focus primarily on ameliorating concentrated poverty in inner-city (and, in some cases, rural) areas.

Maternal monitoring knowledge change and adolescent externalizing behaviors in low-income African American and Latino families

Individual Author: 
Chang, Tzu-Fen
Baolian Qin, Desiree

Drawing on a sample of 318 African American and 354 Latino urban, low-income families, we identify maternal monitoring knowledge trajectories and examine which trajectory predicts fewer late-adolescent externalizing problems and which family and neighborhood factors predict trajectories with positive implications for lateadolescent externalizing behaviors. The majority of adolescents in both groups perceived long-term high levels of maternal monitoring knowledge throughout adolescence—stably high for the African American sample and high for the Latino sample.

The racial ecology of lead poisoning: Toxic inequality in Chicago neighborhoods, 1995-2013

Individual Author: 
Sampson, Robert J.
Winter, Alix S.

This paper examines the racial ecology of lead exposure as a form of environmental inequity, one with both historical and contemporary significance. Drawing on comprehensive data from over one million blood tests administered to Chicago children from 1995-2013 and matched to over 2300 geographic block groups, we address two major questions: (1) What is the nature of the relationship between neighborhood-level racial composition and variability in children’s elevated lead prevalence levels?

“We get a chance to show impact": Program staff reflect on participating in a rigorous, multi-site evaluation

Individual Author: 
Hamadyk, Jill
Gardiner, Karen

This brief summarizes the experiences of leaders and staff from eight career pathways programs that participated in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation. Based on firsthand accounts, the brief describes how staff perceived the benefits of participating in the randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluation, the challenges they experienced—in particular recruiting study participants and implementing its random assignment procedures—and how they overcame challenges. The brief then describes lessons staff learned from participating in PACE.

Academic medical centers and equity in specialty care access for children

Individual Author: 
Bisgaier, Joanna
Polsky, Daniel
Rhodes, Karin V.

Objective: To test whether specialty clinics’ academic medical center (AMC) affiliation was associated with equity in scheduling appointments for children with public vs private insurance. Academic medical centers are safety-net providers of specialty medical care and it is unknown whether equitable access is afforded by AMCs across insurance conditions.

Design: Audit study data were linked to data describing audited clinics.

Setting: Specialty clinics serving children residing in Cook County, Illinois.

Association of Medicaid expansion with access to rehabilitative care in adult trauma patients

Individual Author: 
Zogg, Cheryl K.
Scott, John W.
Metcalfe, David
Gluck, Abbe R.
Curfman, Gregory D.
Davis, Kimberly A.
Dimick, Justin B.
Haider, Adil H.

Importance Trauma is a leading cause of death and disability for patients of all ages, many of whom are also among the most likely to be uninsured. Passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was intended to improve access to care through improvements in insurance. However, despite nationally reported changes in the payer mix of patients, the extent of the law’s impact on insurance coverage among trauma patients is unknown, as is its success in improving trauma outcomes and promoting increased access to rehabilitation.

Efficiency and equity of secondary prevention: Evidence from lead screening in Illinois

Individual Author: 
Gazze, Ludovica

Screening for environmental and health hazards can help governments target scarce resources for remediation whenever complete preventative abatement of pollutants and toxins is not cost-effective. For example, child lead poisoning prevention programs throughout the US first identify children exposed to lead through a blood test and then inspect homes to find and remediate exposure sources.