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MD

Reforming child support to improve outcomes for children and families

Individual Author: 
Turetsky, Vicki

Two decades of research present a stark message to Maryland policymakers: Unrealistic child support policies and practices entangle low-income black families in poverty and have become a destabilizing force in the Baltimore community. Child support orders set beyond the ability of noncustodial parents to comply push them out of low-wage jobs, drown them in debt, hound them into the underground economy, and chase them out of their children’s lives. Of Maryland parents who paid all of their current support, they were expected to pay 18 percent of their earnings toward child support.

Impact of Baltimore Healthy Eating Zones: An environmental intervention to improve diet among African American youth

Individual Author: 
Shin, Ahyoung
Surkan, Pamela J.
Coutinho, Anastasia J.
Suratkar, Sonali R.
Campbell, Rebecca K.
Rowan, Megan
Sharma, Sangita
Dennisuk, Lauren A.
Karlsen, Micaela
Gass, Anthony
Gittelsohn, Joel

This study assessed the impact of a youth-targeted multilevel nutrition intervention in Baltimore City. The study used a clustered randomized design in which 7 recreation centers and 21 corner stores received interventions and 7 additional recreation centers served as comparison. The 8-month intervention aimed to increase availability and selection of healthful foods through nutrition promotion and education using point-of purchase materials such as posters and flyers in stores and interactive sessions such as taste test and cooking demonstrations.

Measuring caseload dynamics and earnings outcomes for TANF participants: State experiences from a Family Self-Sufficiency Data Center initiative

Individual Author: 
Gjertson, Leah
George, Robert
Wiegand, Emily

This presentation was given at the 57th National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Workshop in 2019. The presentation, moderated by Mark Fauth, highlights efforts by states to measure caseload dynamics and earnings outcomes for TANF participants through the Family Self Sufficiency Data Center Initiative. 

Data collection and analysis plan: Family Options Study

Individual Author: 
Gubits, Daniel
Wood, Michelle
McInnis, Debi
Brown, Scott
Spellman, Brooke
Bell, Stephen
Shinn, Marybeth

The objective of the Family Options Study is to provide research evidence to help federal policymakers, community planners, and local practitioners make sound decisions about the best ways to address homelessness among families. The study will compare four combinations of housing and service interventions for homeless families who have been in emergency shelters for at least seven days. The study is conducted as a rigorous, multi-site experiment, to determine what interventions work best to promote family stability and well-being.

Skill, career, and wage mobility among refugees: Understanding refugee's transitions into higher-skill, higher-wage work as a lens to inform effective workforce development policies in the US

Individual Author: 
Bouris, Erica

This presentation draws on: 1) administrative program data collected from over 700 individuals participating in International Rescue Committee career programs (workforce development programs that are explicitly focused on supporting refugees – regardless of previous professional experience or educational background – to move into higher-skill, higher-wage jobs); 2) in-depth, semi-structured interviews with more than 40 refugees from nearly a dozen countries that have participated in International Rescue Committee career programs and; 3) interviews with nearly 20 program staff and key

Precision in measurement: Using state-level Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families administrative records and the Transfer Income Model (TRIM3) to evaluate poverty measurement

Individual Author: 
Shantz, Kathryn
Fox, Liana E.

Policy leaders look to quality data and statistics to help inform and guide programmatic decisions. As a result, assessing the quality and validity of major household surveys in capturing accurate program participation is essential. One method for evaluating survey quality is to compare self-reported program participation in surveys to administrative records from the program itself. In this paper, we are interested in understanding two issues.

Using behavioral interventions to improve service access for Medicaid-eligible pregnant women in Baltimore

Individual Author: 
Sherman, Erin
Secrist, Amy
Gidwani, Suman
Storey, Douglas
Leifer, Jess

Motivation: Baltimore City experiences one of the highest infant mortality rates in the country. Although a large percentage of pregnant women in Baltimore are Medicaid recipients, they often do not take-up pregnancy and postpartum support services that are available with an appropriate referral. Particularly for high-risk pregnancies, this can lead to adverse birth outcomes. To begin accessing these services, Medicaid-eligible patients must have a prenatal risk assessment (PRA) form filled out by their provider.

Noncustodial parent snapshots: Examining who owed support in July 2017

Individual Author: 
Demyan, Natalie
Passarella, Letitia

These snapshots for Maryland and each of the 24 jurisdictions in the state provide demographic information about noncustodial parents, their employment, and their child support orders and payments. Additionally, comparisons are made between noncustodial parents earning full-time minimum wage or less and those earning a living wage. (Author description)

 

Federal and local efforts to support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness

Individual Author: 
Knas, Emily
Stagner, Matthew
Bradley, M.C.

The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

Final report on the Youth Transition Demonstration Evaluation

Individual Author: 
Fraker, Thomas
Mamun, Arif
Honeycutt, Todd
Thompkins, Allison
Valentine, Erin Jacobs

Under contract to SSA, Mathematica Policy Research conducted a rigorous evaluation of the Youth Transition Demonstration (YTD) projects using a random assignment evaluation design. Across the six project sites, more than 5,000 youth enrolled in the evaluation and were randomly assigned to either a treatment group that could participate in the YTD projects or a control group that could not. Mathematica and its partners in the evaluation conducted site-specific analysis to assess the impacts of the interventions one year and three years after youth enrolled in the evaluation.