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Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Publisher ID: 
SSRC-DID-0001994

Participant Perspectives on HPOG 2.0: Design report for in-depth interviews with HPOG 2.0 program participants

Individual Author: 
Thomas, Hannah
Locke, Gretchen
Klerman, Jacob

The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program awards grants to organizations that provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for healthcare occupations that pay well and are in high demand. A National Evaluation of 27 grants awarded in 2015 as part of the second round of HPOG grants (HPOG 2.0) is currently underway. The National Evaluation Descriptive Evaluation will include an interview study of participant experiences in HPOG 2.0.

Portfolio of research in welfare and family self-sufficiency: Fiscal year 2018

Individual Author: 
Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

OPRE’s research in the area of welfare and family self-sufficiency is designed to expand knowledge about effective programs to promote employment, self-sufficiency, and economic well-being among low-income families. Research focuses on five major areas: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Employment and the Labor Market, Education and Training, Behavioral Science, and Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research.

The Learn phase: Creating sustainable change in human services programs

Individual Author: 
McCay, Jonathan
Derr, Michelle K.
Person, Ann

The Learn, Innovate, Improve (or, LI2) process is a way for human services leaders to intentionally launch and systematically guide program change and to incorporate evidence and research methods into such efforts. This practice brief provides an overview of the first phase of LI2—the Learn phase—which is intended to lay the foundation for successful and sustainable program changes. The Learn phase involves two primary steps: (1) clarifying the reason for seeking change and the problem to be addressed, and (2) assessing the program environment’s readiness for change. (Author abstract) 

Implementation of a goal-oriented approach to providing employment services to cash assistance recipients: The Lifelong Learning Initiative in Ramsey County, Minnesota

Individual Author: 
Martinson, Karin
Cook, Rachel

This report describes the early implementation of the Ramsey County, Minnesota, Lifelong Learning Initiative (LLI). The LLI uses a goal-oriented approach to help recipients of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, known as the Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP), set their own employment-focused goals and break them into smaller, manageable, and achievable tasks.

Findings from in-depth interviews with participants in subsidized employment programs

Individual Author: 
Fink, Barbara

Subsidized employment and transitional jobs programs seek to increase employment and earnings among individuals who have not been able to find employment on their own. First-hand accounts of participants’ experiences in these programs can inform efforts to improve long-term employment outcomes for various “hard-to-employ” populations.

Strengthening grantee capacity through evaluation technical assistance

Individual Author: 
Clary, Elizabeth
Bradley, M. C.

The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

Federal and local efforts to support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness

Individual Author: 
Knas, Emily
Stagner, Matthew
Bradley, M.C.

The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

Implementation of two versions of Relationship Smarts Plus in Georgia

Individual Author: 
Baumgartner, Scott
Zaveri, Heather

Since the mid-2000s, the Office of Family Assistance (OFA) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has supported grants to provide healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) programming for youth and adults. More than half of grantees receiving HMRE funding since 2011 have offered relationship education to youth. The current grantee cohort, awarded in 2015, includes 47 HMRE programs, 32 of which serve youth in high school and/or community-based settings.

Organizational culture in TANF offices: A review of the literature

Individual Author: 
Gaffney, Angela
Glosser, Asaph
Agoncillo, Crystal

The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program is designed to help needy families achieve self-sufficiency by providing cash assistance and promoting job preparation, work, marriage, and two-parent families. States receive block grants from the federal government to design and operate TANF cash assistance programs in addition to other benefits and services that promote these goals. Given the flexibility of TANF, states vary in how they implement their TANF programs locally.

Using the science about self-regulation to improve economic outcomes for TANF families

Individual Author: 
Derr, Michelle
McCay, Jonathan
Person, Ann
Anderson, Mary Anne

Administrators and staff of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs are continually looking for new strategies to help their participants achieve economic independence. Many TANF employment programs focus on rapid job placement with some access to short-term education, training, and work-like activities, such as work experience, subsidized employment, and on-the-job training. These programs typically offer child care assistance and some work supports as well.