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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Keith, R.; Selekman, R. ; Burwick, A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2021
    The Pathways implementation study will address two broad objectives. First, it will support interpretation of Pathway's impacts on outcomes. Second, it will generate information about factors that contributed to or inhibited implementation of Pathways services in different settings, to support replication or improvement of future Pathways service delivery. The study is guided by research questions and conceptual frameworks to assess different dimensions of Pathways implementation. These frameworks will support analysis of factors that facilitate or hinder Pathways implementation in different settings and the extent to which the intervention is delivered with fidelity to the service model.
     
    This report describes the design of the Pathways implementation study. 
     
    (Author introduction)
    The Pathways implementation study will address two broad objectives. First, it will support interpretation of Pathway's impacts on outcomes. Second, it will generate information about factors that contributed to or inhibited implementation of Pathways services in different settings, to support replication or improvement of future Pathways service delivery. The study is guided by research questions and conceptual frameworks to assess different dimensions of Pathways implementation. These frameworks will support analysis of factors that facilitate or hinder Pathways implementation in different settings and the extent to which the intervention is delivered with fidelity to the service model.
     
    This report describes the design of the Pathways implementation study. 
     
    (Author introduction)
  • Individual Author: Birman, Dina; Endale, Tarik; St. Jean, Nicole
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2020

    In this article, we comment on the experience of the Kovler Center Child Trauma Program (KCCTP) following the March 21, 2020, shelter at home order in Chicago due to COVID-19. The KCCTP is a program of Heartland Alliance International that was founded in 2018 to provide community-based mental health and social services to immigrant and refugee youth and families who have experienced trauma. COVID-19 temporarily closed the doors of the center, suspending provision of in-person services in the community, and the program was forced to become remote overnight. The KCCTP rapidly transitioned to providing accessible information, active outreach, extensive case management, and flexible delivery of teletherapy and online psychosocial support, finding that attending to structural barriers and basic needs was crucial to family engagement and therapeutic success. Ongoing challenges include technological proficiency and access to computers, Internet, and private spaces. (Author abstract) 
     

    In this article, we comment on the experience of the Kovler Center Child Trauma Program (KCCTP) following the March 21, 2020, shelter at home order in Chicago due to COVID-19. The KCCTP is a program of Heartland Alliance International that was founded in 2018 to provide community-based mental health and social services to immigrant and refugee youth and families who have experienced trauma. COVID-19 temporarily closed the doors of the center, suspending provision of in-person services in the community, and the program was forced to become remote overnight. The KCCTP rapidly transitioned to providing accessible information, active outreach, extensive case management, and flexible delivery of teletherapy and online psychosocial support, finding that attending to structural barriers and basic needs was crucial to family engagement and therapeutic success. Ongoing challenges include technological proficiency and access to computers, Internet, and private spaces. (Author abstract) 
     

  • Individual Author: Hollander, Judd E.; Carr, Brendan G.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2020

    This article explores the growth in popularity and reliance on telemedicine in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. No telemedicine program can be created overnight, but U.S. health systems that have already implemented telemedical innovations have been able to leverage them for the response to Covid-19. More than 50 U.S. health systems already have such programs. Jefferson Health, Mount Sinai, Kaiser Permanente, Cleveland Clinic, and Providence, for example, all leverage telehealth technology to allow clinicians to see patients who are at home. Systems lacking such programs can outsource similar services to physicians and support staff provided by Teladoc Health or American Well. Authors, Dr. Judd E. Hollander and Dr. Brendan G. Carr, explore the benefits and shortcomings of telemedicine and ask if telemedince will have an impact on how in-person health care visits are prioritized. (Author introduction)

    This article explores the growth in popularity and reliance on telemedicine in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. No telemedicine program can be created overnight, but U.S. health systems that have already implemented telemedical innovations have been able to leverage them for the response to Covid-19. More than 50 U.S. health systems already have such programs. Jefferson Health, Mount Sinai, Kaiser Permanente, Cleveland Clinic, and Providence, for example, all leverage telehealth technology to allow clinicians to see patients who are at home. Systems lacking such programs can outsource similar services to physicians and support staff provided by Teladoc Health or American Well. Authors, Dr. Judd E. Hollander and Dr. Brendan G. Carr, explore the benefits and shortcomings of telemedicine and ask if telemedince will have an impact on how in-person health care visits are prioritized. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Laurencin, Cato T.; McClinton, Aneesah
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2020

    The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has significantly impacted and devastated the world. As the infectionspreads, the projected mortality and economic devastation are unprecedented. In particular, racial and ethnic minorities may be ata particular disadvantage as many already assume the status of a marginalized group. Black Americans have a long-standinghistory of disadvantage and are in a vulnerable position to experience the impact of this crisis and the myth of Black immunity toCOVID-19 is detrimental to promoting and maintaining preventative measures. We are the first to present the earliest availabledata in the peer-reviewed literature on the racial and ethnic distribution of COVID-19-confirmed cases and fatalities in the state ofConnecticut. We also seek to explode the myth of Black immunity to the virus. Finally, we call for a National Commission onCOVID-19 Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities to further explore and respond to the unique challenges that the crisis presentsfor Black and Brown communities. (Author abstract)

    The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has significantly impacted and devastated the world. As the infectionspreads, the projected mortality and economic devastation are unprecedented. In particular, racial and ethnic minorities may be ata particular disadvantage as many already assume the status of a marginalized group. Black Americans have a long-standinghistory of disadvantage and are in a vulnerable position to experience the impact of this crisis and the myth of Black immunity toCOVID-19 is detrimental to promoting and maintaining preventative measures. We are the first to present the earliest availabledata in the peer-reviewed literature on the racial and ethnic distribution of COVID-19-confirmed cases and fatalities in the state ofConnecticut. We also seek to explode the myth of Black immunity to the virus. Finally, we call for a National Commission onCOVID-19 Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities to further explore and respond to the unique challenges that the crisis presentsfor Black and Brown communities. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Smith, Anthony C.; Thomas, Emma; Snoswell, Centaine L.; Haydon, Helen; Mehrota, Ateev; Clemensen, Jane; Caffery, Liam J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2020

    The current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is again reminding us of the importance of using telehealth to deliver care, especially as means of reducing the risk of cross-contamination caused by close contact. For telehealth to be effective as part of an emergency response it first needs to become a routinely used part of our health system. Hence, it is time to step back and ask why telehealth is not mainstreamed. In this article, we highlight key requirements for this to occur. Strategies to ensure that telehealth is used regularly in acute, post-acute and emergency situations, alongside conventional service delivery methods, include flexible funding arrangements, training and accrediting our health workforce. Telehealth uptake also requires a significant change in management effort and the redesign of existing models of care. Implementing telehealth proactively rather than reactively is more likely to generate greater benefits in the long-term, and help with the everyday (and emergency) challenges in healthcare. (Author abstract)

    The current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is again reminding us of the importance of using telehealth to deliver care, especially as means of reducing the risk of cross-contamination caused by close contact. For telehealth to be effective as part of an emergency response it first needs to become a routinely used part of our health system. Hence, it is time to step back and ask why telehealth is not mainstreamed. In this article, we highlight key requirements for this to occur. Strategies to ensure that telehealth is used regularly in acute, post-acute and emergency situations, alongside conventional service delivery methods, include flexible funding arrangements, training and accrediting our health workforce. Telehealth uptake also requires a significant change in management effort and the redesign of existing models of care. Implementing telehealth proactively rather than reactively is more likely to generate greater benefits in the long-term, and help with the everyday (and emergency) challenges in healthcare. (Author abstract)

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