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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Birman, Dina; Endale, Tarik; St. Jean, Nicole
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2020

    In this article, we comment on the experience of the Kovler Center Child Trauma Program (KCCTP) following the March 21, 2020, shelter at home order in Chicago due to COVID-19. The KCCTP is a program of Heartland Alliance International that was founded in 2018 to provide community-based mental health and social services to immigrant and refugee youth and families who have experienced trauma. COVID-19 temporarily closed the doors of the center, suspending provision of in-person services in the community, and the program was forced to become remote overnight. The KCCTP rapidly transitioned to providing accessible information, active outreach, extensive case management, and flexible delivery of teletherapy and online psychosocial support, finding that attending to structural barriers and basic needs was crucial to family engagement and therapeutic success. Ongoing challenges include technological proficiency and access to computers, Internet, and private spaces. (Author abstract) 
     

    In this article, we comment on the experience of the Kovler Center Child Trauma Program (KCCTP) following the March 21, 2020, shelter at home order in Chicago due to COVID-19. The KCCTP is a program of Heartland Alliance International that was founded in 2018 to provide community-based mental health and social services to immigrant and refugee youth and families who have experienced trauma. COVID-19 temporarily closed the doors of the center, suspending provision of in-person services in the community, and the program was forced to become remote overnight. The KCCTP rapidly transitioned to providing accessible information, active outreach, extensive case management, and flexible delivery of teletherapy and online psychosocial support, finding that attending to structural barriers and basic needs was crucial to family engagement and therapeutic success. Ongoing challenges include technological proficiency and access to computers, Internet, and private spaces. (Author abstract) 
     

  • Individual Author: Hollander, Judd E.; Carr, Brendan G.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2020

    This article explores the growth in popularity and reliance on telemedicine in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. No telemedicine program can be created overnight, but U.S. health systems that have already implemented telemedical innovations have been able to leverage them for the response to Covid-19. More than 50 U.S. health systems already have such programs. Jefferson Health, Mount Sinai, Kaiser Permanente, Cleveland Clinic, and Providence, for example, all leverage telehealth technology to allow clinicians to see patients who are at home. Systems lacking such programs can outsource similar services to physicians and support staff provided by Teladoc Health or American Well. Authors, Dr. Judd E. Hollander and Dr. Brendan G. Carr, explore the benefits and shortcomings of telemedicine and ask if telemedince will have an impact on how in-person health care visits are prioritized. (Author introduction)

    This article explores the growth in popularity and reliance on telemedicine in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. No telemedicine program can be created overnight, but U.S. health systems that have already implemented telemedical innovations have been able to leverage them for the response to Covid-19. More than 50 U.S. health systems already have such programs. Jefferson Health, Mount Sinai, Kaiser Permanente, Cleveland Clinic, and Providence, for example, all leverage telehealth technology to allow clinicians to see patients who are at home. Systems lacking such programs can outsource similar services to physicians and support staff provided by Teladoc Health or American Well. Authors, Dr. Judd E. Hollander and Dr. Brendan G. Carr, explore the benefits and shortcomings of telemedicine and ask if telemedince will have an impact on how in-person health care visits are prioritized. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: UpSkill America; National Association of Workforce Boards
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2019

    Teaming up with the National Association of Workforce BoardsUpSkill America developed a new tool that explains just how these organizations can help you. The tool provides an overview of what the public workforce system does and connects you to resources to start taking advantage of its services.

    This tool is the latest in a series released in the past year, thanks to a grant from Walmart to support UpSkill America’s work to equip businesses with tools to educate, train, and support frontline workers’ development to advance their careers. The work builds on UpSkill America’s 2017 UpSkilling Playbook for Employers. (Edited author summary)

     

    Teaming up with the National Association of Workforce BoardsUpSkill America developed a new tool that explains just how these organizations can help you. The tool provides an overview of what the public workforce system does and connects you to resources to start taking advantage of its services.

    This tool is the latest in a series released in the past year, thanks to a grant from Walmart to support UpSkill America’s work to equip businesses with tools to educate, train, and support frontline workers’ development to advance their careers. The work builds on UpSkill America’s 2017 UpSkilling Playbook for Employers. (Edited author summary)

     

  • Individual Author: McCay, Jonathan; Derr, Michelle K. ; Person, Ann
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    The Learn, Innovate, Improve (or, LI2) process is a way for human services leaders to intentionally launch and systematically guide program change and to incorporate evidence and research methods into such efforts. This practice brief provides an overview of the first phase of LI2—the Learn phase—which is intended to lay the foundation for successful and sustainable program changes. The Learn phase involves two primary steps: (1) clarifying the reason for seeking change and the problem to be addressed, and (2) assessing the program environment’s readiness for change. (Author abstract) 

    The Learn, Innovate, Improve (or, LI2) process is a way for human services leaders to intentionally launch and systematically guide program change and to incorporate evidence and research methods into such efforts. This practice brief provides an overview of the first phase of LI2—the Learn phase—which is intended to lay the foundation for successful and sustainable program changes. The Learn phase involves two primary steps: (1) clarifying the reason for seeking change and the problem to be addressed, and (2) assessing the program environment’s readiness for change. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Brady, Anthea; Goins, Rachel; Young, Monica
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2019

    The complex and interrelated challenges that place-based initiatives such as Promise Neighborhoods address require that many stakeholders be involved, informed, and inspired to act. Stakeholders must understand and buy into the initiative’s priority challenges, responsive strategies, and overall goals. This engagement is vital to effective implementation, including evaluating what works, deciding what to sustain, and investing in the most potent strategies. Effective messaging is necessary for creating a common understanding and mobilizing necessary action from the community. This guide is designed for project teams working on place-based initiatives as a resource for establishing a communications strategy and developing compelling stories about their work. It offers a useful framework for stakeholder engagement and an application of this framework to the Promise Neighborhoods context. The guide also includes a resource list with tools and references that readers can access to support the actions recommended throughout the guide. (Author abstract)

     

     

     

    The complex and interrelated challenges that place-based initiatives such as Promise Neighborhoods address require that many stakeholders be involved, informed, and inspired to act. Stakeholders must understand and buy into the initiative’s priority challenges, responsive strategies, and overall goals. This engagement is vital to effective implementation, including evaluating what works, deciding what to sustain, and investing in the most potent strategies. Effective messaging is necessary for creating a common understanding and mobilizing necessary action from the community. This guide is designed for project teams working on place-based initiatives as a resource for establishing a communications strategy and developing compelling stories about their work. It offers a useful framework for stakeholder engagement and an application of this framework to the Promise Neighborhoods context. The guide also includes a resource list with tools and references that readers can access to support the actions recommended throughout the guide. (Author abstract)

     

     

     

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