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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Brown, Steven; Charleston, Donnie; Ramarkrishnan, Kriti; Ford, LesLeigh, D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2020

    Long Island— the United States’ first suburb—is by many measures an economically prosperous place.  However, opportunity is not spread equally on Long Island. Long-standing discrimination and residential segregation created and maintains racial disparities, with black Long Islanders experiencing more limited access to employment, lower incomes, and greater financial insecurity.

    This report surveys the landscape of Long Island and provides insight into the policies and efforts currently underway to support the economic advancement of black residents, identifies both programmatic and geographic gaps in assistance, and highlights promising practices from elsewhere in New York and across the country that could be adopted on Long Island. The report also includes statistical analyses that give context to the current state of racial and economic disparities on Long Island.

    With a focus on efforts to improve employment outcomes, strengthen financial well-being, and support pathways to entrepreneurship, our research found several challenges inhibiting economic equity for...

    Long Island— the United States’ first suburb—is by many measures an economically prosperous place.  However, opportunity is not spread equally on Long Island. Long-standing discrimination and residential segregation created and maintains racial disparities, with black Long Islanders experiencing more limited access to employment, lower incomes, and greater financial insecurity.

    This report surveys the landscape of Long Island and provides insight into the policies and efforts currently underway to support the economic advancement of black residents, identifies both programmatic and geographic gaps in assistance, and highlights promising practices from elsewhere in New York and across the country that could be adopted on Long Island. The report also includes statistical analyses that give context to the current state of racial and economic disparities on Long Island.

    With a focus on efforts to improve employment outcomes, strengthen financial well-being, and support pathways to entrepreneurship, our research found several challenges inhibiting economic equity for black residents:

    • Perceptions of Long Island as a broadly prosperous place, which obscure racial disparities and reduce the urgency for targeted inventions,
    • Underdeveloped capacity in the nonprofit sector, especially for efforts related to employment and entrepreneurship,
    • Geographic issues (e.g. suburbanization, multiple jurisdictions, distance) hindering cross-program collaboration and duplication.

    We also identify key opportunities to advance racial equity, including:

    • Using existing funding to strengthen connections between training programs, job placement programs, and employers
    • Expanding and replicating promising and successful efforts, such as financial coaching and adopting workforce system integration efforts used by National Fund for Workforce Solutions regional collaboratives.

    (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    OPRE’s research in the area of welfare and family self-sufficiency is designed to expand knowledge about effective programs to promote employment, self-sufficiency, and economic well-being among low-income families. Research focuses on five major areas: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Employment and the Labor Market, Education and Training, Behavioral Science, and Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research. Within these areas, OPRE funds experimental impact evaluations, implementation evaluations, and descriptive research projects aimed at informing the design and implementation of programs. OPRE also invests in activities to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. This Portfolio of Research in Welfare and Family Self-Sufficiency describes major welfare and family self-sufficiency research projects sponsored by OPRE in Fiscal Year 2018. (Author abstract) 

     

    OPRE’s research in the area of welfare and family self-sufficiency is designed to expand knowledge about effective programs to promote employment, self-sufficiency, and economic well-being among low-income families. Research focuses on five major areas: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Employment and the Labor Market, Education and Training, Behavioral Science, and Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research. Within these areas, OPRE funds experimental impact evaluations, implementation evaluations, and descriptive research projects aimed at informing the design and implementation of programs. OPRE also invests in activities to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. This Portfolio of Research in Welfare and Family Self-Sufficiency describes major welfare and family self-sufficiency research projects sponsored by OPRE in Fiscal Year 2018. (Author abstract) 

     

  • Individual Author: Sama-Miller, Emily; Kleinman, Rebecca; Timmins, Lori; Dahlen, Heather
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    Decades of research have produced convincing evidence of a strong relationship between having a job and enjoying good health. But does employment cause health outcomes or does health cause employment outcomes? If employment can cause health outcomes, does working make health better or worse?

    We distilled the findings from a voluminous literature to draw what conclusions we could from research about the causal relationship between employment and health. That is, we were interested in research evidence that could demonstrate whether a change in employment is responsible for a change in health or vice versa. We also examined the causal relationship between work environment and health, because the relationship between employment and health may depend on the nature and quality of a job, as well. (Edited author introduction)

    Decades of research have produced convincing evidence of a strong relationship between having a job and enjoying good health. But does employment cause health outcomes or does health cause employment outcomes? If employment can cause health outcomes, does working make health better or worse?

    We distilled the findings from a voluminous literature to draw what conclusions we could from research about the causal relationship between employment and health. That is, we were interested in research evidence that could demonstrate whether a change in employment is responsible for a change in health or vice versa. We also examined the causal relationship between work environment and health, because the relationship between employment and health may depend on the nature and quality of a job, as well. (Edited author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Kauff, Jacqueline F.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    This brief was developed under the Goal-Oriented Adult Learning in Self-Sufficiency (GOALS) project on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE). Under this project, Mathematica Policy Research explored how emerging insights from psychology, neuroscience, behavioral science, and goal achievement can inform workforce development programs for lowincome adults. Several project activities contributed to the development of this brief, including

    (1) a literature synthesis that identified self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals and the environmental influences that can support or inhibit optimal use of these skills (Cavadel et al. 2017),

    (2) telephone calls and exploratory site visits to document how programs for low-income populations are trying to improve and support use of self-regulation skills and goal attainment (Anderson et al. 2018),

    (3) the development of a conceptual framework for understanding the relationship between self-regulation, goal...

    This brief was developed under the Goal-Oriented Adult Learning in Self-Sufficiency (GOALS) project on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE). Under this project, Mathematica Policy Research explored how emerging insights from psychology, neuroscience, behavioral science, and goal achievement can inform workforce development programs for lowincome adults. Several project activities contributed to the development of this brief, including

    (1) a literature synthesis that identified self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals and the environmental influences that can support or inhibit optimal use of these skills (Cavadel et al. 2017),

    (2) telephone calls and exploratory site visits to document how programs for low-income populations are trying to improve and support use of self-regulation skills and goal attainment (Anderson et al. 2018),

    (3) the development of a conceptual framework for understanding the relationship between self-regulation, goal attainment, and employment outcomes (Anderson et al. 2017),

    (4) evidence-informed quality improvement activities in TANF programs implementing new interventions focused on self-regulation and goal attainment (Derr et al. 2018), and

    (5) telephone interviews with employers that have engaged in public-private partnerships for workforce development. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Maxwell, Kelly; Starr, Rebecca
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    Licensing is traditionally viewed as providing the foundation (or the floor) of quality in early care and education (ECE) settings. States and territories are responsible for licensing child care programs, and a license serves as permission to legally operate a child care program. The essential purpose of licensing is to provide basic protections to prevent harm to children. Initiatives like Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) often build on the basic requirements of licensing to define quality and support programs in achieving higher levels of quality. This conceptualization of licensing as a basic, first step toward quality has begun to change recently. Licensing is increasingly viewed as integral all along the quality continuum, not just as the floor of quality. Further, some ECE policymakers are considering how all aspects of the licensing system—from the standards to monitoring compliance to enforcement—can support the quality of ECE. Although the conceptual relationship between licensing and quality is evolving, there is little research about how licensing...

    Licensing is traditionally viewed as providing the foundation (or the floor) of quality in early care and education (ECE) settings. States and territories are responsible for licensing child care programs, and a license serves as permission to legally operate a child care program. The essential purpose of licensing is to provide basic protections to prevent harm to children. Initiatives like Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) often build on the basic requirements of licensing to define quality and support programs in achieving higher levels of quality. This conceptualization of licensing as a basic, first step toward quality has begun to change recently. Licensing is increasingly viewed as integral all along the quality continuum, not just as the floor of quality. Further, some ECE policymakers are considering how all aspects of the licensing system—from the standards to monitoring compliance to enforcement—can support the quality of ECE. Although the conceptual relationship between licensing and quality is evolving, there is little research about how licensing influences quality. This brief provides a framework to support discussion and research in this important area. (Author introduction)

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