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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Chilton, Mariana; Coates, Spencer; Doar, Robert; Everett, Jeremy; Finn, Susan ; Frank, Deborah ; Jamason, Cherie ; Shore, Billy; Sykes, Russell
    Year: 2015

    To identify solutions to hunger, Congress created the bipartisan National Commission on Hunger “to provide policy recommendations to Congress and the USDA Secretary to more effectively use existing programs and funds of the Department of Agriculture to combat domestic hunger and food insecurity.”

    This report is based on the commission members’ full agreement that hunger cannot be solved by food alone, nor by government efforts alone. The solutions to hunger require a stronger economy, robust community engagement, corporate partnerships, and greater personal responsibility, as well as strong government programs. (Author executive summary)

    To identify solutions to hunger, Congress created the bipartisan National Commission on Hunger “to provide policy recommendations to Congress and the USDA Secretary to more effectively use existing programs and funds of the Department of Agriculture to combat domestic hunger and food insecurity.”

    This report is based on the commission members’ full agreement that hunger cannot be solved by food alone, nor by government efforts alone. The solutions to hunger require a stronger economy, robust community engagement, corporate partnerships, and greater personal responsibility, as well as strong government programs. (Author executive summary)

  • Individual Author: Solomon-Fears, Carmen; Falk, Gene; Fernandes-Alcantara, Adrienne L.
    Year: 2013

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the...

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the policy community that might improve the lives of low-income noncustodial fathers and their children. For example, social policy could play a role by expanding economic assistance programs to noncustodial fathers, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); and implementing strategies to prevent the build-up of unpaid child support through early intervention. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Burke, Vee; Gabe, Thomas; Falk, Gene
    Year: 2004

    This is an opportune time to examine the economic status of families with children.  The 109th Congress faces a decision on what terms to continue the major cash welfare program for children (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families —TANF) and entitlement child care funding. Congress may also consider making changes in social security, which now makes monthly payments to almost 4 million children whose breadwinner is dead, disabled, or aged.

    Since enactment of TANF in 1996, family cash welfare rolls have fallen by more than 50%, the employment rates of single mothers in the general population have risen dramatically, and the number of poor children has declined by more than 1 million.  However, the data show that “full-time working poverty” has increased overall among families with children.

    The social safety net for children consists of (1) earnings-based social insurance benefits and tax credits and (2) need-based transfers of cash and noncash benefits. In 2003, the House voted that the (overarching) purpose of TANF should be to “improve child well-being.”  This...

    This is an opportune time to examine the economic status of families with children.  The 109th Congress faces a decision on what terms to continue the major cash welfare program for children (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families —TANF) and entitlement child care funding. Congress may also consider making changes in social security, which now makes monthly payments to almost 4 million children whose breadwinner is dead, disabled, or aged.

    Since enactment of TANF in 1996, family cash welfare rolls have fallen by more than 50%, the employment rates of single mothers in the general population have risen dramatically, and the number of poor children has declined by more than 1 million.  However, the data show that “full-time working poverty” has increased overall among families with children.

    The social safety net for children consists of (1) earnings-based social insurance benefits and tax credits and (2) need-based transfers of cash and noncash benefits. In 2003, the House voted that the (overarching) purpose of TANF should be to “improve child well-being.”  This report profiles the economic well-being of children.  It presents data on official poverty among children and employment rates of mothers.  It discusses 2003 child poverty rates in detail: by family type, by work experience and education of the family head, and by immigration status of the family head.  Lastly, it provides a brief background discussion about government “safety net” policy. (author abstract)

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