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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Radel, Laura; Baldwin, Melinda; Crouse, Gilbert; Ghertner, Robin; Waters, Annette
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This study examined the relationship between parental substance misuse and child welfare caseloads, which began rising in 2012 after more than a decade of decline. We examined county level variation in both phenomena and qualitative interviews documented the perspectives and experiences of local professionals in the child welfare agency, substance use disorder treatment programs, family courts, and other community partners in 11 communities across the country. Results describe how the child welfare system interacts with community partners to serve an increasing population of parents whose substance use has impaired their parenting and placed their children at risk. (Author abstract) 

    This study examined the relationship between parental substance misuse and child welfare caseloads, which began rising in 2012 after more than a decade of decline. We examined county level variation in both phenomena and qualitative interviews documented the perspectives and experiences of local professionals in the child welfare agency, substance use disorder treatment programs, family courts, and other community partners in 11 communities across the country. Results describe how the child welfare system interacts with community partners to serve an increasing population of parents whose substance use has impaired their parenting and placed their children at risk. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Hui, Katrina; Angelotta, Cara; Fisher, Carl E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    In July 2016, Tennessee allowed its ‘fetal-assault’ statute to expire. This controversial law was the first to criminalize substance use explicitly during pregnancy. While the law’s expiration is a positive development, its enactment 2 years prior reflects a growing trend in pregnancy control measures in the United States, where there has been a dramatic increase in punitive policies toward women who use alcohol during pregnancy. These measures are part of a broader surge in restrictive provisions regarding sexual and reproductive health; 30% of all such restrictions enacted since 1973 have been established only during the past 6 years. Unlike Tennessee, more than one-third of US states punish pregnant women for substance use through pre-existing laws, erecting considerable barriers to treatment and co-opting the medical profession through mandatory testing and reporting. Although the United States is an outlier in this respect, these practices deserve special attention, both to advocate for change and to caution against the international adoption of similar policies, an ever-...

    In July 2016, Tennessee allowed its ‘fetal-assault’ statute to expire. This controversial law was the first to criminalize substance use explicitly during pregnancy. While the law’s expiration is a positive development, its enactment 2 years prior reflects a growing trend in pregnancy control measures in the United States, where there has been a dramatic increase in punitive policies toward women who use alcohol during pregnancy. These measures are part of a broader surge in restrictive provisions regarding sexual and reproductive health; 30% of all such restrictions enacted since 1973 have been established only during the past 6 years. Unlike Tennessee, more than one-third of US states punish pregnant women for substance use through pre-existing laws, erecting considerable barriers to treatment and co-opting the medical profession through mandatory testing and reporting. Although the United States is an outlier in this respect, these practices deserve special attention, both to advocate for change and to caution against the international adoption of similar policies, an ever-present risk, as long as the criminalization of substance use can be seized upon for political gain (as demonstrated by events in the Philippines). States should, instead, work towards comprehensive treatment of women with substance use disorders, an essential public health need. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: McLellan, A. Thomas; Gutman, Marjorie; Lynch, Kevin; McKay, James R.; Ketterlinus, Robert; Morgenstern, Jon; Woolis, Diana
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a multiservice intervention designed to move substance abusing women on welfare to sobriety and self-sufficiency by addressing their substance abuse, domestic violence, employment, and basic needs. Design: A field evaluation with repeated measures at 6 and 12 months on an intent-to-treat sample of 529 women conducted in 11 selected sites across the country. There were significant improvements shown in substance use and family and social functioning by the 6-month point, and additional improvements in employment by the 12-month point. By 12 months, more than 46% were abstinent from alcohol and other drugs, and 30% were employed at least part-time. There were only modest improvements shown in the medical and psychiatric status of these women. These preliminary findings suggest that site-level interagency coordination and program-level case management were associated with improvements in the targeted areas as predicted by the model. Future work will require a more closely specified, manual-guided form of the intervention plus the inclusion of control...

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a multiservice intervention designed to move substance abusing women on welfare to sobriety and self-sufficiency by addressing their substance abuse, domestic violence, employment, and basic needs. Design: A field evaluation with repeated measures at 6 and 12 months on an intent-to-treat sample of 529 women conducted in 11 selected sites across the country. There were significant improvements shown in substance use and family and social functioning by the 6-month point, and additional improvements in employment by the 12-month point. By 12 months, more than 46% were abstinent from alcohol and other drugs, and 30% were employed at least part-time. There were only modest improvements shown in the medical and psychiatric status of these women. These preliminary findings suggest that site-level interagency coordination and program-level case management were associated with improvements in the targeted areas as predicted by the model. Future work will require a more closely specified, manual-guided form of the intervention plus the inclusion of control groups and cost measures to fully evaluate the cost benefits from the final form of the intervention. (author abstract)

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