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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Karpman, Michael; Zuckerman, Stephen; Gonzalez, Dulce; Kenney, Genevieve M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2020

    As it confronts the COVID-19 pandemic, the US faces what could be its worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. A successful government response to the economic consequences of the pandemic is critical for sustaining families’ health and well-being and allowing families to remain housed as major sectors of the economy remain closed. The success of this response will partly depend on its effectiveness in reaching the families hardest hit by the loss of jobs and incomes. As relief is distributed, policymakers will need timely data on families’ financial and material well-being to evaluate and improve current efforts and inform new legislation. This brief uses new data from the Urban Institute’s Health Reform Monitoring Survey, a nationally representative survey of nonelderly adults conducted between March 25 and April 10, 2020, to examine the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on families’ employment and abilities to meet basic needs, as well as racial/ethnic and family income–related disparities in the economic impact of the pandemic. As of late March/early April, we find...

    As it confronts the COVID-19 pandemic, the US faces what could be its worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. A successful government response to the economic consequences of the pandemic is critical for sustaining families’ health and well-being and allowing families to remain housed as major sectors of the economy remain closed. The success of this response will partly depend on its effectiveness in reaching the families hardest hit by the loss of jobs and incomes. As relief is distributed, policymakers will need timely data on families’ financial and material well-being to evaluate and improve current efforts and inform new legislation. This brief uses new data from the Urban Institute’s Health Reform Monitoring Survey, a nationally representative survey of nonelderly adults conducted between March 25 and April 10, 2020, to examine the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on families’ employment and abilities to meet basic needs, as well as racial/ethnic and family income–related disparities in the economic impact of the pandemic. As of late March/early April, we find the following: 

    • Just over 4 in 10 nonelderly adults (41.5 percent) reported that their families have lost jobs, work hours, or work-related income because of the coronavirus outbreak.
    • Job and income losses are widespread but more prevalent among the families of low-income and Hispanic adults.
    • In response to the crisis, 30.6 percent of adults reported that their families reduced spending on food, 43.1 percent put off major purchases, and 27.9 percent drew down savings or increased credit card debt. Among adults in families that lost work or income, 46.5 percent reduced spending on food, 58.1 percent put off major purchases, and 43.9 percent tapped savings or increased credit card debt.
    • Low-income, Hispanic, and black adults were most likely to report that their families reduced spending on food, delayed major purchases, or used savings or increased credit card debt.
    • As families cope with new financial challenges, many have experienced serious material hardships. Nearly one-third of adults (31.0 percent) reported that their families could not pay the rent, mortgage, or utility bills, were food insecure, or went without medical care because of the cost during the last 30 days. Among adults in families that lost work or income, the share experiencing these material hardships was 42.0 percent over the same time period.
    • Over two-thirds (68.6 percent) of adults with family incomes below the federal poverty level and over 45 percent of black and Hispanic adults reported that their families experienced one or more of these hardships in the last 30 days.
    • Looking ahead to the next month, adults are most likely to be worried about being able to work enough hours (38.5 percent) and pay their debts (33.1 percent), and more than one-quarter worry about paying for housing, utility, and medical costs and having enough food to eat. (Author abstract)
  • Individual Author: McCay, Jonathan; Derr, Michelle K. ; Person, Ann
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    The Learn, Innovate, Improve (or, LI2) process is a way for human services leaders to intentionally launch and systematically guide program change and to incorporate evidence and research methods into such efforts. This practice brief provides an overview of the first phase of LI2—the Learn phase—which is intended to lay the foundation for successful and sustainable program changes. The Learn phase involves two primary steps: (1) clarifying the reason for seeking change and the problem to be addressed, and (2) assessing the program environment’s readiness for change. (Author abstract) 

    The Learn, Innovate, Improve (or, LI2) process is a way for human services leaders to intentionally launch and systematically guide program change and to incorporate evidence and research methods into such efforts. This practice brief provides an overview of the first phase of LI2—the Learn phase—which is intended to lay the foundation for successful and sustainable program changes. The Learn phase involves two primary steps: (1) clarifying the reason for seeking change and the problem to be addressed, and (2) assessing the program environment’s readiness for change. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Brady, Anthea; Goins, Rachel; Young, Monica
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2019

    The complex and interrelated challenges that place-based initiatives such as Promise Neighborhoods address require that many stakeholders be involved, informed, and inspired to act. Stakeholders must understand and buy into the initiative’s priority challenges, responsive strategies, and overall goals. This engagement is vital to effective implementation, including evaluating what works, deciding what to sustain, and investing in the most potent strategies. Effective messaging is necessary for creating a common understanding and mobilizing necessary action from the community. This guide is designed for project teams working on place-based initiatives as a resource for establishing a communications strategy and developing compelling stories about their work. It offers a useful framework for stakeholder engagement and an application of this framework to the Promise Neighborhoods context. The guide also includes a resource list with tools and references that readers can access to support the actions recommended throughout the guide. (Author abstract)

     

     

     

    The complex and interrelated challenges that place-based initiatives such as Promise Neighborhoods address require that many stakeholders be involved, informed, and inspired to act. Stakeholders must understand and buy into the initiative’s priority challenges, responsive strategies, and overall goals. This engagement is vital to effective implementation, including evaluating what works, deciding what to sustain, and investing in the most potent strategies. Effective messaging is necessary for creating a common understanding and mobilizing necessary action from the community. This guide is designed for project teams working on place-based initiatives as a resource for establishing a communications strategy and developing compelling stories about their work. It offers a useful framework for stakeholder engagement and an application of this framework to the Promise Neighborhoods context. The guide also includes a resource list with tools and references that readers can access to support the actions recommended throughout the guide. (Author abstract)

     

     

     

  • Individual Author: Stacy, Christina; Craigie, Terry-Ann; Meixell, Brady; MacDonald, Graham; Zheng, Sihan Vivian; Davis, Christopher; Baird, Christina; Chartoff, Ben; Hinson, David; Lei, Serena
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2019

    In many cities, low-income residents live far from available jobs, and employers can’t find people to fill open positions. Economists call this “spatial mismatch”—a mismatch between where jobs are located and where job seekers live, which can cause high unemployment rates and lead to longer spells of joblessness. Data from Snag, the largest online marketplace for hourly jobs, show us that this is true for job seekers who use their platform. Snag data capture a large number of low-wage job seekers in each metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Looking at 2017, the most recent year of data, we analyzed the distance between every job seeker and the jobs they applied for, allowing us to map out spatial mismatch. And we talked to local government and workforce officials in two regions to learn what they’re doing to overcome this problem. (Author introduction modified)

    In many cities, low-income residents live far from available jobs, and employers can’t find people to fill open positions. Economists call this “spatial mismatch”—a mismatch between where jobs are located and where job seekers live, which can cause high unemployment rates and lead to longer spells of joblessness. Data from Snag, the largest online marketplace for hourly jobs, show us that this is true for job seekers who use their platform. Snag data capture a large number of low-wage job seekers in each metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Looking at 2017, the most recent year of data, we analyzed the distance between every job seeker and the jobs they applied for, allowing us to map out spatial mismatch. And we talked to local government and workforce officials in two regions to learn what they’re doing to overcome this problem. (Author introduction modified)

  • Individual Author: Pahigiannis, K.; Rosanbalm, K.; Murray, D. W.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2019

    Toddlers are rapidly developing movement and language abilities that help them interact with their surroundings. They may go through changes from infant to toddler care settings, or from younger to older toddler childcare rooms, which bring new people, new schedules, and new expectations. Positive relationships with caregivers are essential for cultivating emerging self-regulation skills. This document provides tips to help caregivers use co-regulation to promote self-regulation skill development in toddlers. (Edited author introduction)

     

    Toddlers are rapidly developing movement and language abilities that help them interact with their surroundings. They may go through changes from infant to toddler care settings, or from younger to older toddler childcare rooms, which bring new people, new schedules, and new expectations. Positive relationships with caregivers are essential for cultivating emerging self-regulation skills. This document provides tips to help caregivers use co-regulation to promote self-regulation skill development in toddlers. (Edited author introduction)

     

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