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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Gomby, Deanna S.; Krantzler, Nora; Larner, Mary B.; Stevenson, Carol S.; Terman, Donna L.; Behrman, Richard E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This Analysis begins with a brief description of current funding for child care services and continues with a review of the problems in the child care system. Main proposals for reform of child care financing are described. The Analysis next estimates costs for these plans and examines some of the ways that necessary additional dollars could be raised. Principles to guide any financing reform are suggested, and the Analysis concludes with a discussion of the prospects for change. (author introduction)

    This Analysis begins with a brief description of current funding for child care services and continues with a review of the problems in the child care system. Main proposals for reform of child care financing are described. The Analysis next estimates costs for these plans and examines some of the ways that necessary additional dollars could be raised. Principles to guide any financing reform are suggested, and the Analysis concludes with a discussion of the prospects for change. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Walker, James R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This article proposes two financing plans to address what the author identifies as the two primary concerns in the child care field: (1) a child allowance for poor and near-poor households to address the child care problems of low-income families, and (2) a program of voluntary parental leave, available to all parents at child birth or adoption, to ensure the adequacy of infant care.

    The child allowance plan would cover the first three children in families up to 175% of the poverty level (more than 22 million children) at an annual cost of $45 billion. The author suggests that the allowance could be financed by redirecting funds from existing income support (for example, Aid to Families with Dependent Children), tax credit, and tax deduction programs.

    Financing the parental leave program would require new revenues, generated by an employee-paid increase in payroll tax totaling 3.5%. Each employee's contributions would create a parental leave account (PLA). Families could use the funds in these accounts to cover the cost of a one-year leave from work after the birth...

    This article proposes two financing plans to address what the author identifies as the two primary concerns in the child care field: (1) a child allowance for poor and near-poor households to address the child care problems of low-income families, and (2) a program of voluntary parental leave, available to all parents at child birth or adoption, to ensure the adequacy of infant care.

    The child allowance plan would cover the first three children in families up to 175% of the poverty level (more than 22 million children) at an annual cost of $45 billion. The author suggests that the allowance could be financed by redirecting funds from existing income support (for example, Aid to Families with Dependent Children), tax credit, and tax deduction programs.

    Financing the parental leave program would require new revenues, generated by an employee-paid increase in payroll tax totaling 3.5%. Each employee's contributions would create a parental leave account (PLA). Families could use the funds in these accounts to cover the cost of a one-year leave from work after the birth or adoption of a child. If families did not have enough dollars in their accounts to cover the cost of the leave, the federal government would extend a low-interest loan to them, which they would have to pay back. The amount individuals receive through Social Security would be adjusted upward or downward according to the balances in their parental leave accounts at retirement.

    The author suggests that both proposals would help parents balance work and family obligations and protect parental freedom of choice over the care and upbringing of their children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Goldberg, Lenny M.; Schulz, Thomas W.; Piel, Michele
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    Three authors respond to proposals by their fellow authors in Volume 6, Issue 2 of The Future of Children, titled Financing Child Care. These proposals are described in the articles "Funding Child Care and Public Education" by Edward F. Zigler and Matia Finn-Stevenson, and "Funding Child Rearing: Child Allowance and Parental Leave" by James R. Walker.

    Three authors respond to proposals by their fellow authors in Volume 6, Issue 2 of The Future of Children, titled Financing Child Care. These proposals are described in the articles "Funding Child Care and Public Education" by Edward F. Zigler and Matia Finn-Stevenson, and "Funding Child Rearing: Child Allowance and Parental Leave" by James R. Walker.

  • Individual Author: Lewit, Eugene M.; Baker, Linda Schuurmann
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This Child Indicators article focuses on available data on homeless families and children. First, it reviews different definitions of homelessness and the most common methods used to estimate the size of the homeless population. It then examines data on subgroups of homeless children and youths in the United States and considers the duration of homelessness for families with children that use shelter services. Finally, it examines trends in the numbers of families who are at risk of losing their housing. (author introduction)

    This Child Indicators article focuses on available data on homeless families and children. First, it reviews different definitions of homelessness and the most common methods used to estimate the size of the homeless population. It then examines data on subgroups of homeless children and youths in the United States and considers the duration of homelessness for families with children that use shelter services. Finally, it examines trends in the numbers of families who are at risk of losing their housing. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Baugher, Eleanor; Lamison-White, Leatha
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    This report presents data for calendar year 1995 on the social and economic characteristics of the population living below the poverty level. These data were compiled from information collected in the March 1996 Current Population Survey (CPS) conducted by the Bureau of the Census. The poverty definition used in most of this report was originally adopted for official government use by the Office of Management and Budget in 1969. Poverty status is defined by a set of money income thresholds that vary by family size and composition. Families or individuals with income below their appropriate poverty thresholds are classified as poor.

    The official poverty definition is based on pre-tax money income only, excluding capital gains, and does not include the value of noncash benefits such as employer-provided health insurance, food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, or public housing. In the early 1980’s the Census Bureau embarked on separate research programs to examine: 1) the effect of government noncash benefits on poverty and 2) the effect of taxes on measures of the...

    This report presents data for calendar year 1995 on the social and economic characteristics of the population living below the poverty level. These data were compiled from information collected in the March 1996 Current Population Survey (CPS) conducted by the Bureau of the Census. The poverty definition used in most of this report was originally adopted for official government use by the Office of Management and Budget in 1969. Poverty status is defined by a set of money income thresholds that vary by family size and composition. Families or individuals with income below their appropriate poverty thresholds are classified as poor.

    The official poverty definition is based on pre-tax money income only, excluding capital gains, and does not include the value of noncash benefits such as employer-provided health insurance, food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, or public housing. In the early 1980’s the Census Bureau embarked on separate research programs to examine: 1) the effect of government noncash benefits on poverty and 2) the effect of taxes on measures of the distribution of income. This report contains a section entitled ‘‘Alternative Definitions of Poverty’’ which presents updated estimates of the incremental effects of benefits and taxes on poverty for 1995.

    The comparability of the data for 1995 with those from previous surveys is affected by three changes: 1) this year the March CPS is based entirely on the 1990 census sampling frame; 2) there was a reduction in the size of the sample in January 1996; and 3) people who indicate the ‘‘other race’’ category are now allocated to a specific race category. This report also includes poverty statistics on the foreign-born population for the first time. (author introduction)

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