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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Dorn, Stan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The most frequent reason that uninsured adults who visited a health insurance marketplace gave for not enrolling in marketplace coverage was unaffordability, even with subsidies. This report examines how several states appeared to overcome this obstacle. For example, Minnesota uses a Medicaid waiver to provide more affordable coverage outside the marketplace to consumers with incomes up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level, planning to transition to the Basic Health Program in 2015. Vermont supplements federal subsidies inside the marketplace to improve affordability for consumers with incomes up to 300 percent of poverty. (author abstract)

    The most frequent reason that uninsured adults who visited a health insurance marketplace gave for not enrolling in marketplace coverage was unaffordability, even with subsidies. This report examines how several states appeared to overcome this obstacle. For example, Minnesota uses a Medicaid waiver to provide more affordable coverage outside the marketplace to consumers with incomes up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level, planning to transition to the Basic Health Program in 2015. Vermont supplements federal subsidies inside the marketplace to improve affordability for consumers with incomes up to 300 percent of poverty. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Abraham, Katharine G.; Houseman, Susan N.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    During the recent recession only seventeen states offered short-time compensation (STC)—prorated unemployment benefits for workers whose hours are reduced for economic reasons. Federal legislation passed in 2012 will encourage the expansion of STC. Exploiting cross-state variation in STC, we present new evidence indicating that jobs saved during the recession as a consequence of STC may have been significant in manufacturing, but that the overall scale of the STC program was generally too small to have substantially mitigated aggregate job losses in the seventeen states. Expansion of the program is necessary for STC to be an effective countercyclical tool in the future. (Author abstract)

     

    During the recent recession only seventeen states offered short-time compensation (STC)—prorated unemployment benefits for workers whose hours are reduced for economic reasons. Federal legislation passed in 2012 will encourage the expansion of STC. Exploiting cross-state variation in STC, we present new evidence indicating that jobs saved during the recession as a consequence of STC may have been significant in manufacturing, but that the overall scale of the STC program was generally too small to have substantially mitigated aggregate job losses in the seventeen states. Expansion of the program is necessary for STC to be an effective countercyclical tool in the future. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Bradley, Erica
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    When house prices crashed in 2006-2007, foreclosures increased. The ensuing financial crisis and deep recession exacerbated the impact.

    Concerned that foreclosures—and the associated property abandonment and crime—were destructive to communities, the federal government launched the Neighborhood Stabilization Program in 2008. Under the program, $3.92 billion was appropriated in grants to states, municipalities, and tribal governments. The funds could be used for the following:

    • To establish financing mechanisms for purchase and redevelopment of foreclosed homes and residential properties;
    • To purchase and rehabilitate homes and residential properties abandoned or foreclosed;
    • To establish land banks for foreclosed homes;
    • To demolish blighted structures; and
    • To redevelop demolished or vacant properties.

    Administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), funds were disbursed to states.[1] Each state had the authority to allocate funds to grantees, depending on which communities were classified...

    When house prices crashed in 2006-2007, foreclosures increased. The ensuing financial crisis and deep recession exacerbated the impact.

    Concerned that foreclosures—and the associated property abandonment and crime—were destructive to communities, the federal government launched the Neighborhood Stabilization Program in 2008. Under the program, $3.92 billion was appropriated in grants to states, municipalities, and tribal governments. The funds could be used for the following:

    • To establish financing mechanisms for purchase and redevelopment of foreclosed homes and residential properties;
    • To purchase and rehabilitate homes and residential properties abandoned or foreclosed;
    • To establish land banks for foreclosed homes;
    • To demolish blighted structures; and
    • To redevelop demolished or vacant properties.

    Administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), funds were disbursed to states.[1] Each state had the authority to allocate funds to grantees, depending on which communities were classified as high need by the 2008 Housing and Economic Recovery Act's allocation formula.[2] Grantees (municipalities or nonprofits in high-foreclosure areas) used funds to purchase and redevelop foreclosed homes. The homes were then sold—at market value or subsidized by NSP funds—to new homeowners. Most funds went into urban areas, but in northern Maine, Vermont, and New Hampshire (the Northern Tier), funds were also used in troubled suburban and rural areas. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Levin-Epstein, Jodie
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    The author describes how state and city governments are taking the lead in giving visibility to poverty and opportunity through task-force initiatives, summits, and state poverty targets. (author abstract)

    The author describes how state and city governments are taking the lead in giving visibility to poverty and opportunity through task-force initiatives, summits, and state poverty targets. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pavetti, LaDonna; Derr, Michelle; Martin, Emily Sama
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Assessment often is the first step in helping TANF recipients living with a disability find and maintain employment. While some TANF recipients living with a disability enter TANF fully aware of their disability, many do not. There are multiple strategies that TANF agencies can employ to identify recipients whose program participation or employment difficulties may be influenced by the presence of a disability or to develop an appropriate employment plan once a disability is identified. In this practice brief, drawing on the experiences of six different TANF initiatives targeted to recipients living with a disability, we describe five different approaches to assessment: disability screening, psychosocial assessments, clinical and psychological assessments, functional needs assessments and vocational assessments. (author abstract)

    Assessment often is the first step in helping TANF recipients living with a disability find and maintain employment. While some TANF recipients living with a disability enter TANF fully aware of their disability, many do not. There are multiple strategies that TANF agencies can employ to identify recipients whose program participation or employment difficulties may be influenced by the presence of a disability or to develop an appropriate employment plan once a disability is identified. In this practice brief, drawing on the experiences of six different TANF initiatives targeted to recipients living with a disability, we describe five different approaches to assessment: disability screening, psychosocial assessments, clinical and psychological assessments, functional needs assessments and vocational assessments. (author abstract)

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