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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Benfer, Emily A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, revealed systemic government malfeasance that exposed an entire city population to lead-contaminated water. It also alerted the nation to the fact that lead poisoning remains endemic and threatens the livelihood of children across the country. The problem extends beyond Flint—a recent report identified more than 2,600 areas in the United States that have lead poisoning rates at least double those recorded during the peak of the Flint crisis. According to the American Healthy Homes Survey, conducted by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), 37 million homes in the United States have lead-based paint that will become a hazard if not closely monitored and maintained, and, of those, more 23 million homes have one or more significant lead-based paint hazard. This means one in three homes with children younger than age six - the age group most vulnerable to lead poisoning-contain significant lead-based paint hazards. Outside the home, leaded gasoline and lead smelting plants have deposited dangerous levels of lead and other toxic...

    The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, revealed systemic government malfeasance that exposed an entire city population to lead-contaminated water. It also alerted the nation to the fact that lead poisoning remains endemic and threatens the livelihood of children across the country. The problem extends beyond Flint—a recent report identified more than 2,600 areas in the United States that have lead poisoning rates at least double those recorded during the peak of the Flint crisis. According to the American Healthy Homes Survey, conducted by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), 37 million homes in the United States have lead-based paint that will become a hazard if not closely monitored and maintained, and, of those, more 23 million homes have one or more significant lead-based paint hazard. This means one in three homes with children younger than age six - the age group most vulnerable to lead poisoning-contain significant lead-based paint hazards. Outside the home, leaded gasoline and lead smelting plants have deposited dangerous levels of lead and other toxic contaminants in neighborhoods across the country. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Yoder, Jamie R.; Brisson, Daniel; Lopez, Amy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    The effect of nonresidential father relationship characteristics on delinquency trajectories among low-income youth (N = 799) was examined using data from the Three Cities Study, a longitudinal study of mothers and their children eligible for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio. Growth curve models were employed to track delinquency trajectories and their rate of growth. Characteristics of father-child relationships (anger-alienation, trust-communication) were specified as predictors of delinquency while controlling for father involvement and family structure. Trust-communication influenced delinquency growth, but the rate of growth slowed as youth aged. Implications for programs, interventions, and policy are explored. (Author abstract)

    The effect of nonresidential father relationship characteristics on delinquency trajectories among low-income youth (N = 799) was examined using data from the Three Cities Study, a longitudinal study of mothers and their children eligible for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio. Growth curve models were employed to track delinquency trajectories and their rate of growth. Characteristics of father-child relationships (anger-alienation, trust-communication) were specified as predictors of delinquency while controlling for father involvement and family structure. Trust-communication influenced delinquency growth, but the rate of growth slowed as youth aged. Implications for programs, interventions, and policy are explored. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gillespie, Sarah; Popkin, Susan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This brief describes the opportunities to use housing as a platform for resident services, the challenges to coordinating services effectively in public and assisted housing, and the strategies and recommendations to ensure that service coordination is evidence based. It primarily highlights insights from the Urban Institute’s Housing Opportunity and Service’s Together (HOST) demonstration established in 2010 to test a whole-family, wraparound model for addressing intergenerational poverty and disadvantage in public and subsidized housing. Adapting lessons from HOST for current service coordination models, even in an environment of scarce resources, creates opportunities for new partners, strategies, and flexibilities. (author abstract)

    This brief describes the opportunities to use housing as a platform for resident services, the challenges to coordinating services effectively in public and assisted housing, and the strategies and recommendations to ensure that service coordination is evidence based. It primarily highlights insights from the Urban Institute’s Housing Opportunity and Service’s Together (HOST) demonstration established in 2010 to test a whole-family, wraparound model for addressing intergenerational poverty and disadvantage in public and subsidized housing. Adapting lessons from HOST for current service coordination models, even in an environment of scarce resources, creates opportunities for new partners, strategies, and flexibilities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pendall, Rolf; Hendey, Leah; Greenberg, David; Pettit, Kathryn L.S.; Levy, Diane; Khare, Amy; Gallagher, Megan; Joseph, Mark; Curley, Alexandra; Rasheed, Aesha; Latham, Nancy; Brecher, Audra ; Hailey, Chantal
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The Choice Neighborhoods Initiative (Choice) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) aims to transform distressed, high-poverty rate neighborhoods into revitalized mixed-income neighborhoods. Its primary vehicle to catalyze this transformation is the rebuilding of distressed public and assisted housing into energy-efficient, mixed-income housing that is physically and financially viable. (author abstract)

    The Choice Neighborhoods Initiative (Choice) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) aims to transform distressed, high-poverty rate neighborhoods into revitalized mixed-income neighborhoods. Its primary vehicle to catalyze this transformation is the rebuilding of distressed public and assisted housing into energy-efficient, mixed-income housing that is physically and financially viable. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Byndloss, D. Crystal; Reid, Chera
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    Most high school reform efforts understandably fo­cus on boosting the success of low-income students who are underachieving academi­cally, aiming to help them graduate ready for the rigors of college. But in every school dis­trict where students struggle, there are aca­demically capable low-income and minority students who do graduate from high school and are well prepared for college. Yet each year, many of these students choose to at­tend nonselective four-year colleges where graduation rates are distressingly low. Oth­ers enroll at two-year colleges, where degree completion and transfer rates are even low­er. Many more do not attend college at all.               

    This phenomenon — called “undermatching” — was first examined by Melissa Roderick and her colleagues at the Consortium on Chicago School Research. Bowen, Chingos, and McPherson confirmed that students are more likely to graduate college when they at­tend the most academically demanding insti­tution that will admit them. More recently, a study by Caroline Hoxby and her colleagues gained popular attention for...

    Most high school reform efforts understandably fo­cus on boosting the success of low-income students who are underachieving academi­cally, aiming to help them graduate ready for the rigors of college. But in every school dis­trict where students struggle, there are aca­demically capable low-income and minority students who do graduate from high school and are well prepared for college. Yet each year, many of these students choose to at­tend nonselective four-year colleges where graduation rates are distressingly low. Oth­ers enroll at two-year colleges, where degree completion and transfer rates are even low­er. Many more do not attend college at all.               

    This phenomenon — called “undermatching” — was first examined by Melissa Roderick and her colleagues at the Consortium on Chicago School Research. Bowen, Chingos, and McPherson confirmed that students are more likely to graduate college when they at­tend the most academically demanding insti­tution that will admit them. More recently, a study by Caroline Hoxby and her colleagues gained popular attention for demonstrating that it was possible to increase the rate at which very high-achieving, low-income stu­dents enrolled in the most selective colleges and universities by providing them with tai­lored information about opportunities there.

    In 2010, MDRC and its partners pilot-tested an innovative advising program, College Match, in three Chicago public high schools. It took on the undermatch challenge directly by delivering crucial information to help a broad range of academically qualified stu­dents and their parents make thoughtful decisions about college enrollment. College Match has now expanded to New York City. This practitioner brief presents practical lessons from the College Match Program in Chicago. It offers five strategies that show promise, that could be widely applicable, that counselors and advisers can integrate into their existing college guidance activi­ties, and that can be implemented in college advising settings in and out of schools. (author abstract)

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