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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Sandfort, Jodi R.; Hill, Martha S.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This article examines a sample of young, unmarried mothers from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and considers how different types of economic support received soon after their first child is born contributes to the later self-sufficiency of young, unmarried mothers. It expands conventional categories of income support—AFDC, food stamps, child support—to include shared housing and relatives' assistance. The model also contains various behaviors of young mothers after the birth of their first child. The findings suggest that certain economic supports assist these mothers and that life choices they make after their child's birth are important to self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

    This article examines a sample of young, unmarried mothers from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and considers how different types of economic support received soon after their first child is born contributes to the later self-sufficiency of young, unmarried mothers. It expands conventional categories of income support—AFDC, food stamps, child support—to include shared housing and relatives' assistance. The model also contains various behaviors of young mothers after the birth of their first child. The findings suggest that certain economic supports assist these mothers and that life choices they make after their child's birth are important to self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Harris, Kathleen M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    I examine the process by which single mothers who have ever experienced and ended a spell on welfare return to welfare for further economic support. My analyses address the permanency of welfare independence by type of exit and identify those women who manage to stay off welfare. I use the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) for the years 1983 to 1988; the data contain monthly reports of welfare receipt (AFDC) and employment status. Returns to welfare are quite common and often occur soon after leaving: Over one quarter of the women in this study return to welfare within one year of exiting, and 42 percent return within two years. I find that repeat dependency on welfare is determined by social isolation, child-care responsibilities, human capital, and family economic status. Moreover, the route by which women exit welfare is less important to their chances of remaining off welfare than is the sequence of life events and changing circumstances that occur after their welfare exit. (author abstract) 

    I examine the process by which single mothers who have ever experienced and ended a spell on welfare return to welfare for further economic support. My analyses address the permanency of welfare independence by type of exit and identify those women who manage to stay off welfare. I use the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) for the years 1983 to 1988; the data contain monthly reports of welfare receipt (AFDC) and employment status. Returns to welfare are quite common and often occur soon after leaving: Over one quarter of the women in this study return to welfare within one year of exiting, and 42 percent return within two years. I find that repeat dependency on welfare is determined by social isolation, child-care responsibilities, human capital, and family economic status. Moreover, the route by which women exit welfare is less important to their chances of remaining off welfare than is the sequence of life events and changing circumstances that occur after their welfare exit. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Blank, Rebecca M. ; Ruggles, Patricia
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This paper investigates dynamic patterns in the relationship between eligibility and participation in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and Food Stamp programs, using monthly longitudinal data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation. The results indicate that there are many relatively short eligibility spells that do not result in program participation, and end with increases in income. Participation is most likely to occur among women with lower current and future earnings opportunities, and is affected by locational and policy parameters. Those who elect to participate in these programs tend to start receiving benefits almost immediately upon becoming eligible. A substantial number of women exit these programs before their eligibility ends; among at least some of these women it is likely that unreported changes in income are occurring. In 1989, if all eligible single-parent families had participated in AFDC and Food Stamps, benefit payments in these programs would have been $13.5 billion higher. (author abstract)

    This paper investigates dynamic patterns in the relationship between eligibility and participation in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and Food Stamp programs, using monthly longitudinal data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation. The results indicate that there are many relatively short eligibility spells that do not result in program participation, and end with increases in income. Participation is most likely to occur among women with lower current and future earnings opportunities, and is affected by locational and policy parameters. Those who elect to participate in these programs tend to start receiving benefits almost immediately upon becoming eligible. A substantial number of women exit these programs before their eligibility ends; among at least some of these women it is likely that unreported changes in income are occurring. In 1989, if all eligible single-parent families had participated in AFDC and Food Stamps, benefit payments in these programs would have been $13.5 billion higher. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Moore, Kristin A.; Zaslow, Martha J.; Coiro, Mary Jo; Miller, Suzanne M.; Magenheim, Ellen B.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    The centerpiece of the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA) is the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) Program, which requires eligible recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) to participate in educational, job training and work experience, or job search activities, in order to reduce welfare dependency and promote self-sufficiency. Although most services offered through JOBS are aimed at meeting the needs of adults, there are numerous reasons to expect that JOBS may also affect children in families that receive AFDC...

    The purposes of this report are to describe the lives and circumstances of this sample of AFDC families with preschool-aged children in Fulton County, Georgia and to inform policymakers about the mothers' goals and the development of their children. In addition, the study provides a context within which we will examine later impacts of the JOBS program on children. (author abstract)

    The centerpiece of the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA) is the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) Program, which requires eligible recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) to participate in educational, job training and work experience, or job search activities, in order to reduce welfare dependency and promote self-sufficiency. Although most services offered through JOBS are aimed at meeting the needs of adults, there are numerous reasons to expect that JOBS may also affect children in families that receive AFDC...

    The purposes of this report are to describe the lives and circumstances of this sample of AFDC families with preschool-aged children in Fulton County, Georgia and to inform policymakers about the mothers' goals and the development of their children. In addition, the study provides a context within which we will examine later impacts of the JOBS program on children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cohen, Abby J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    Over the past 60 years, the federal government has provided funding for child care and early education programs in fits and starts. Funding has fluctuated in amount and purpose, with the result that today's child care financing system is a confused collection of funding streams with no uniform goals, standards, or administrative structure. This article traces the history of federal funding for child care and early education programs in the United States and examines how the values of American society have shaped the federal funding of child care and early education services. (author abstract)

    Over the past 60 years, the federal government has provided funding for child care and early education programs in fits and starts. Funding has fluctuated in amount and purpose, with the result that today's child care financing system is a confused collection of funding streams with no uniform goals, standards, or administrative structure. This article traces the history of federal funding for child care and early education programs in the United States and examines how the values of American society have shaped the federal funding of child care and early education services. (author abstract)

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