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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: New York City Department of Consumer Affairs Office of Financial Empowerment
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2009

    Capitalizing on lessons learned from behavioral economics, the $aveNYC Account limits choices, encourages individuals to save by facilitating a separate account for savings, and simplifies the process of committing to save, while creating certain obstacles and disincentives for withdrawing funds. The $aveNYC Account program offers New Yorkers with lower incomes a 50 percent match if they direct deposit part of their tax refund into a branded “$aveNYC Account” and maintain the initial deposit for at least one year.1 This one-time decision to forego a portion of their refund, combined with limited access to the account and a generous match, precipitates short-term savings with the intention of moving individuals on a pathway toward longer-term savings and greater financial stability. The $aveNYC Account pilot program enables OFE to test the following research questions:

    1. Do families with very low incomes save if presented with the right incentives and opportunities?

    2. Can an incentivized savings program be implemented at a large scale?

    3. Can short-term, non...

    Capitalizing on lessons learned from behavioral economics, the $aveNYC Account limits choices, encourages individuals to save by facilitating a separate account for savings, and simplifies the process of committing to save, while creating certain obstacles and disincentives for withdrawing funds. The $aveNYC Account program offers New Yorkers with lower incomes a 50 percent match if they direct deposit part of their tax refund into a branded “$aveNYC Account” and maintain the initial deposit for at least one year.1 This one-time decision to forego a portion of their refund, combined with limited access to the account and a generous match, precipitates short-term savings with the intention of moving individuals on a pathway toward longer-term savings and greater financial stability. The $aveNYC Account pilot program enables OFE to test the following research questions:

    1. Do families with very low incomes save if presented with the right incentives and opportunities?

    2. Can an incentivized savings program be implemented at a large scale?

    3. Can short-term, non-goal directed savings improve financial stability?

    This research brief focuses primarily on OFE’s first research question, and presents findings from the first year of program implementation. Early findings do indeed show that those with lower incomes can and do save when presented with the right incentives and opportunities. (Author abstract)