Skip to main content
Back to Top

 

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Office of Child Support Enforcement
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    There are more than 560 federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native tribes in the U.S.  According to the 2000 census, more than 30 percent of all Native American children under the age of 18 live with one parent.

    Questions commonly arise when employers are working with tribes, such as:

    • Do tribes have their own child support programs?
    • Where do I send payments for an IWO that comes from a tribe?
    • Do tribes have their own laws?
    • Must I honor a request for employment verification from a tribe if I am not a tribal employer or located on tribal land?

    (author abstract)

    There are more than 560 federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native tribes in the U.S.  According to the 2000 census, more than 30 percent of all Native American children under the age of 18 live with one parent.

    Questions commonly arise when employers are working with tribes, such as:

    • Do tribes have their own child support programs?
    • Where do I send payments for an IWO that comes from a tribe?
    • Do tribes have their own laws?
    • Must I honor a request for employment verification from a tribe if I am not a tribal employer or located on tribal land?

    (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Turetsky, Vicki
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    This policy brief explains why policymakers and practitioners should manage the child support obligations of incarcerated and re-entering men to help them maintain regular employment, limit participation in the underground economy, reduce recidivism, and provide steady support to their children over time. (author abstract)

    This policy brief explains why policymakers and practitioners should manage the child support obligations of incarcerated and re-entering men to help them maintain regular employment, limit participation in the underground economy, reduce recidivism, and provide steady support to their children over time. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Glosser, Asaph; Germain, Justin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    The rise of online platform work through companies such as Uber, Care.com, and TaskRabbit has increased the visibility of alternative work arrangements. This has sparked interest among researchers, policymakers, and program administrators in the “gig economy” and its implications for labor markets, worker protections, and access to benefits. For child support programs, the emergence of the gig economy presents a new dimension to the longstanding challenge of establishing and enforcing child support orders for noncustodial parents working outside traditional salaried employment—in jobs that are often temporary, part-time, and contingent. Nontraditional work arrangements provide individuals with opportunities to generate income with greater flexibility to choose work hours and tasks. However, they often do not provide the same level of economic security as traditional arrangements. Independent workers are less likely to be covered by labor and employment laws, such as a minimum wage, overtime compensation, and unemployment compensation. Moreover, while nontraditional work...

    The rise of online platform work through companies such as Uber, Care.com, and TaskRabbit has increased the visibility of alternative work arrangements. This has sparked interest among researchers, policymakers, and program administrators in the “gig economy” and its implications for labor markets, worker protections, and access to benefits. For child support programs, the emergence of the gig economy presents a new dimension to the longstanding challenge of establishing and enforcing child support orders for noncustodial parents working outside traditional salaried employment—in jobs that are often temporary, part-time, and contingent. Nontraditional work arrangements provide individuals with opportunities to generate income with greater flexibility to choose work hours and tasks. However, they often do not provide the same level of economic security as traditional arrangements. Independent workers are less likely to be covered by labor and employment laws, such as a minimum wage, overtime compensation, and unemployment compensation. Moreover, while nontraditional work arrangements may allow workers additional avenues to earn income, certain employee-based benefits and subsidies such as health insurance, retirement benefits, and life insurance are typically not as available as through traditional work arrangements. In recent years, the growth of the gig economy, where workers’ participation is more transitory than in traditional independent contract work, has contributed to an increase in nontraditional work. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Ovwigho, Pamela C.; Suanders, Correne; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    As is often the case, Maryland has been on the cutting edge of new thinking and, in November 2000 began the Arrears Leveraging Pilot Project (ALPP), a small demonstration project in Baltimore City. A collaborative effort among state and local child support officials and community-based organizations, the pilot was intended to encourage low-income, non-paying absent parents to pay their current support by rewarding consistent payment behavior with reduction or elimination of arrears they owed to the state. In mid-2004, the Child Support Enforcement Administration, Maryland Department of Human Resources asked the authors to study the program and to address certain important questions. This report is the result of our work on that task. Specifically, using a variety of administrative data sources, the remainder of this report addresses five questions:

    1) What percentage of parents made it through each of the program phases?
    2) What are the characteristics of program participants?
    3) What changes, if any, occur in employment rates, stability and earnings after...

    As is often the case, Maryland has been on the cutting edge of new thinking and, in November 2000 began the Arrears Leveraging Pilot Project (ALPP), a small demonstration project in Baltimore City. A collaborative effort among state and local child support officials and community-based organizations, the pilot was intended to encourage low-income, non-paying absent parents to pay their current support by rewarding consistent payment behavior with reduction or elimination of arrears they owed to the state. In mid-2004, the Child Support Enforcement Administration, Maryland Department of Human Resources asked the authors to study the program and to address certain important questions. This report is the result of our work on that task. Specifically, using a variety of administrative data sources, the remainder of this report addresses five questions:

    1) What percentage of parents made it through each of the program phases?
    2) What are the characteristics of program participants?
    3) What changes, if any, occur in employment rates, stability and earnings after graduation from the program and what are the patterns over time?
    4) What changes, if any, occur in the welfare receipt patterns of participants’ children after the participants have graduated from the program?
    5) Are there any changes in participants’ child support payment behavior during their enrollment in the project?

    ALPP was a small pilot, operating in one jurisdiction and suffered a variety of implementation and other difficulties. Nonetheless, answers to these five fundamental questions about the program should provide valuable information and insights for elected and appointed officials about a child support issue of great importance to low-income families, child support agencies and states. The issue, at root, is this: what strategies or programs are needed to permit us to effectively balance the need of our state’s children for financial support from their absent parents with the ability of absent parents to provide that support in the here-and-now without being crushed under the weight of insurmountable accumulated debt. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Enchautegui, Maria
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This study examines the role of employers in the integration of immigrants with a focus on workplace practices. A review of the literature and interviews with key informants revealed integration practices employers are undertaking and uncovered the factors that foster and hinder the adoption of such practices. Immigrant-serving organizations, labor unions, and community colleges are instrumental in employers’ decisions to adopt workplace integration practices. By systematizing the knowledge about employer engagement in immigrant integration and identifying what can employers do, this study can be a tool to employers looking to foster the integration of their rapidly growing immigrant workforce. (author abstract) 

    This study examines the role of employers in the integration of immigrants with a focus on workplace practices. A review of the literature and interviews with key informants revealed integration practices employers are undertaking and uncovered the factors that foster and hinder the adoption of such practices. Immigrant-serving organizations, labor unions, and community colleges are instrumental in employers’ decisions to adopt workplace integration practices. By systematizing the knowledge about employer engagement in immigrant integration and identifying what can employers do, this study can be a tool to employers looking to foster the integration of their rapidly growing immigrant workforce. (author abstract) 

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1946 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations