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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Neumark, David; Thompson, Matthew; Koyle, Leslie
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    We provide updated evidence on the effects of living wage laws in U.S. cities, relative to the earlier research covering only the first six or seven years of existence of these laws. There are some challenges to updating the evidence, as the CPS data on which it relies changed geographic coding systems in the mid-2000s. The updated evidence is broadly consistent with the conclusions reached by prior research, including Holzer's (2008) review of that earlier evidence. Living wage laws reduce employment among the least-skilled workers they are intended to help. But they also increase wages for many of them. This implies that living wage laws generate both winners and losers among those affected by them. For broader living wage laws that cover recipients of business or financial assistance from cities, the net effects point to modest reductions in urban poverty. (author abstract)

    We provide updated evidence on the effects of living wage laws in U.S. cities, relative to the earlier research covering only the first six or seven years of existence of these laws. There are some challenges to updating the evidence, as the CPS data on which it relies changed geographic coding systems in the mid-2000s. The updated evidence is broadly consistent with the conclusions reached by prior research, including Holzer's (2008) review of that earlier evidence. Living wage laws reduce employment among the least-skilled workers they are intended to help. But they also increase wages for many of them. This implies that living wage laws generate both winners and losers among those affected by them. For broader living wage laws that cover recipients of business or financial assistance from cities, the net effects point to modest reductions in urban poverty. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Powers, Elizabeth T.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    Fast-food establishments in Illinois and Indiana were surveyed during a period of state-mandated minimum-wage increases in Illinois. While entry-level wages of Illinois establishments rose substantially in response to the mandated increases, there is little evidence that Illinois establishments ameliorated wage increases by delaying scheduled raises or reducing fringe benefit offerings. There is little evidence of ‘labor-labor’ substitution in favor of women, better educated, or teenaged workers, or increased worker tenure at the new wage, but weak evidence of increased food prices. In contrast, there are large declines in part-time positions and workers’ hours in Illinois relative to Indiana. Aggregate figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics support relative declines in total fast-food employment in ‘downstate’ Illinois counties, as hypothesized. However, establishments’ responses do not appear proportionate to the strength of the minimum wage change. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a...

    Fast-food establishments in Illinois and Indiana were surveyed during a period of state-mandated minimum-wage increases in Illinois. While entry-level wages of Illinois establishments rose substantially in response to the mandated increases, there is little evidence that Illinois establishments ameliorated wage increases by delaying scheduled raises or reducing fringe benefit offerings. There is little evidence of ‘labor-labor’ substitution in favor of women, better educated, or teenaged workers, or increased worker tenure at the new wage, but weak evidence of increased food prices. In contrast, there are large declines in part-time positions and workers’ hours in Illinois relative to Indiana. Aggregate figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics support relative declines in total fast-food employment in ‘downstate’ Illinois counties, as hypothesized. However, establishments’ responses do not appear proportionate to the strength of the minimum wage change. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper published by the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan.

  • Individual Author: Allegretto, Sylvia; Godoey, Anna ; Nadler, Carl ; Reich, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    In recent years, a new wave of state and local activity has transformed minimum wage policy in the U.S. As of August 2018, ten large cities and seven states have enacted minimum wage policies in the $12 to $15 range. Dozens of smaller cities and counties have also enacted wage standards in this range. These higher minimum wages, which are being phased in gradually, will cover well over 20 percent of the U.S. workforce. With a substantial number of additional cities and states poised to soon enact similar policies, a large portion of the U.S. labor market will be held to a higher wage standard than has been typical over the past 50 years.

    These minimum wage levels substantially exceed the previous peak in the federal minimum wage, which reached just under $10 (in today’s dollars) in the late 1960s. As a result, the new policies will increase pay directly for 15 to 30 percent of the workforce in these cities and as much as 40 to 50 percent of the workforce in some industries and regions. By contrast, the federal and state minimum wage increases between 1984 and 2014...

    In recent years, a new wave of state and local activity has transformed minimum wage policy in the U.S. As of August 2018, ten large cities and seven states have enacted minimum wage policies in the $12 to $15 range. Dozens of smaller cities and counties have also enacted wage standards in this range. These higher minimum wages, which are being phased in gradually, will cover well over 20 percent of the U.S. workforce. With a substantial number of additional cities and states poised to soon enact similar policies, a large portion of the U.S. labor market will be held to a higher wage standard than has been typical over the past 50 years.

    These minimum wage levels substantially exceed the previous peak in the federal minimum wage, which reached just under $10 (in today’s dollars) in the late 1960s. As a result, the new policies will increase pay directly for 15 to 30 percent of the workforce in these cities and as much as 40 to 50 percent of the workforce in some industries and regions. By contrast, the federal and state minimum wage increases between 1984 and 2014 increased pay directly for less than eight percent of the applicable workforce.

    This report examines the effects of these new policies. Although minimum wage effects on employment have been much studied and debated, this new wave of higher minimum wages attains levels beyond the evidential reach of most previous studies. Moreover, city-level policies might have effects that differ from those of state and federal policies. Yet, most of the empirical studies of minimum wages focus on the state and federal-level policies. The literature on the effects of city-level minimum wages is much smaller. Our report helps fill these gaps. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Kendall, Jessica; Nadeau, Lou; Acs, Gregory; Neumark, David
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities, on August 9, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EDT. The webinar focused on how changes in the minimum wage affect individuals, families, employers and the economy. Today, the U.S. economy continues to grow and the unemployment rate remains low. Wage growth, however, remains slow for much of the labor force. The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 an hour since 2009. The combination of job growth and wage stagnation has led many localities to increase their minimum wage. Economists and research experts presented on what we know about minimum wage increases and their effects on workers, low-income families, employers, and state/local economies. 

    This document is the Q&A from Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities. View the recording, transcript, and Q&A document...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities, on August 9, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EDT. The webinar focused on how changes in the minimum wage affect individuals, families, employers and the economy. Today, the U.S. economy continues to grow and the unemployment rate remains low. Wage growth, however, remains slow for much of the labor force. The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 an hour since 2009. The combination of job growth and wage stagnation has led many localities to increase their minimum wage. Economists and research experts presented on what we know about minimum wage increases and their effects on workers, low-income families, employers, and state/local economies. 

    This document is the Q&A from Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities. View the recording, transcript, and Q&A document here.

     

  • Individual Author: Kendall, Jessica; Nadeau, Lou; Acs, Gregory; Neumark, David
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities, on August 9, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EDT. The webinar focused on how changes in the minimum wage affect individuals, families, employers and the economy. Today, the U.S. economy continues to grow and the unemployment rate remains low. Wage growth, however, remains slow for much of the labor force. The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 an hour since 2009. The combination of job growth and wage stagnation has led many localities to increase their minimum wage. Economists and research experts presented on what we know about minimum wage increases and their effects on workers, low-income families, employers, and state/local economies. 

    This document is the transcript from Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities. View the recording, PowerPoint, and Q&A document...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities, on August 9, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EDT. The webinar focused on how changes in the minimum wage affect individuals, families, employers and the economy. Today, the U.S. economy continues to grow and the unemployment rate remains low. Wage growth, however, remains slow for much of the labor force. The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 an hour since 2009. The combination of job growth and wage stagnation has led many localities to increase their minimum wage. Economists and research experts presented on what we know about minimum wage increases and their effects on workers, low-income families, employers, and state/local economies. 

    This document is the transcript from Understanding the Minimum Wage: Implications for Workers, Employers, and Communities. View the recording, PowerPoint, and Q&A document here.

     

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