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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1976

    This statute authorized the provision of federal health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives. It also helped form the basis for the Indian Health Service, an agency with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  It was reauthorized by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. 

    Public Law. No. 94-437 (1976). 

     

    This statute authorized the provision of federal health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives. It also helped form the basis for the Indian Health Service, an agency with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  It was reauthorized by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. 

    Public Law. No. 94-437 (1976). 

     

  • Individual Author: Miller, Paul E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1998

    The Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR) is an alternative to the Food Stamp program on Montana's seven Indian reservations. FDPIR is the main anti-hunger program on these reservations which have poverty rates, on average, that are three times higher than the state average. Of the 1,356 FDPIR households studied on the seven reservations, 56% have experienced hunger, as measured on a five-item index. Six out of 10 households rely on FDPIR as their main or only source of food. Any reductions in FDPIR that might result from federal welfare reform initiatives will cause increases in hunger on all reservations, especially among families with young children. (Author abstract)

    The Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR) is an alternative to the Food Stamp program on Montana's seven Indian reservations. FDPIR is the main anti-hunger program on these reservations which have poverty rates, on average, that are three times higher than the state average. Of the 1,356 FDPIR households studied on the seven reservations, 56% have experienced hunger, as measured on a five-item index. Six out of 10 households rely on FDPIR as their main or only source of food. Any reductions in FDPIR that might result from federal welfare reform initiatives will cause increases in hunger on all reservations, especially among families with young children. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Brave Heart, Maria Yellow Horse; DeBruyn, Lemyra M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1998

    American Indians experienced massive losses of lives, land, and culture from European contact and colonization resulting in a long legacy of chronic trauma and unresolved grief across generations. This phenomenon, labeled historical unresolved grief, contributes to the current social pathology of high rates of suicide, homicide, domestic violence, child abuse, alcoholism and other social problems among American Indians. The present paper describes the concept of historical unresolved grief and historical trauma among American Indians, outlining the historical as well as present social and political forces which exacerbate it. The abundant literature on Jewish Holocaust survivors and their children is used to delineate the intergenerational transmission of trauma, grief, and the survivor's child complex. Interventions based on traditional American Indian ceremonies and modern western treatment modalities for grieving and healing of those losses are described. (Author abstract)

    American Indians experienced massive losses of lives, land, and culture from European contact and colonization resulting in a long legacy of chronic trauma and unresolved grief across generations. This phenomenon, labeled historical unresolved grief, contributes to the current social pathology of high rates of suicide, homicide, domestic violence, child abuse, alcoholism and other social problems among American Indians. The present paper describes the concept of historical unresolved grief and historical trauma among American Indians, outlining the historical as well as present social and political forces which exacerbate it. The abundant literature on Jewish Holocaust survivors and their children is used to delineate the intergenerational transmission of trauma, grief, and the survivor's child complex. Interventions based on traditional American Indian ceremonies and modern western treatment modalities for grieving and healing of those losses are described. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: McCovey, Shaunna
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1998

    When people attempt to define poverty it is most often looked at in regards to the Gross National Product (GNP), an interpretation of material exchanges. If one has accumulated a significant amount of material goods, then one is considered wealthy. Any deficiency in such goods, and one would be viewed as poor.

    I would like to look at poverty and inequality in another way, offer a less restricted view, and go so far as to define poverty as culture; to see it not in terms of dollars and cents, but rather a phenomenon that has allowed tradition, heritage, and values to flourish among Indian peoples. (author introduction)

    When people attempt to define poverty it is most often looked at in regards to the Gross National Product (GNP), an interpretation of material exchanges. If one has accumulated a significant amount of material goods, then one is considered wealthy. Any deficiency in such goods, and one would be viewed as poor.

    I would like to look at poverty and inequality in another way, offer a less restricted view, and go so far as to define poverty as culture; to see it not in terms of dollars and cents, but rather a phenomenon that has allowed tradition, heritage, and values to flourish among Indian peoples. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Waller, Margaret A.; Risley-Curtiss, Christina; Murphy, Sharon; Medill, Anne; Moore, Gloria
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1998

    Reflecting biases that permeate the U.S. culture, professional accounts generally interpret stories of minority women from a deficit perspective. Problems such as substance abuse, domestic violence, and teenage pregnancy are often presented from an outsider's viewpoint and cast as intrapersonal phenomena independent of historical, political, and cultural context. This article suggests that stories and their implications change significantly depending on whether they are interpreted from a deficit or strengths perspective. Stories of American Indian Women, in their own voices, are discussed as a case example. (author abstract)

    Reflecting biases that permeate the U.S. culture, professional accounts generally interpret stories of minority women from a deficit perspective. Problems such as substance abuse, domestic violence, and teenage pregnancy are often presented from an outsider's viewpoint and cast as intrapersonal phenomena independent of historical, political, and cultural context. This article suggests that stories and their implications change significantly depending on whether they are interpreted from a deficit or strengths perspective. Stories of American Indian Women, in their own voices, are discussed as a case example. (author abstract)

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